20 Questions for New Artists Sidebar: The Economic Reality of Streaming

May 16, 2019 Comments off

Streaming is all the rage.  But–it is cannibalizing higher margin goods, even digital goods.  Because of the industry standard revenue share method of dividing up royalties, all artists essentially get a market share allocation of streaming service revenue based on the number of streams.  Plus, with some exceptions, your royalty rate is dependent on factors you have no control over.  What this means in simple math is that streaming royalties on a per-stream basis will always decline over time (see also Malthusianism).

 

Artists’ dismal streaming royalties on music subscription services are largely based on a simple calculation:  A per-stream payment derived from a share of the service’s revenue prorated by number of streams.  Artists get a portion of a service’s monthly revenue (at least the revenue the service discloses) based on a ratio of your plays to all the plays.  Your plays will always be a lot smaller than the total plays.  (This is essentially what Sharky Laguana referred to as the “Big Pool.”)

Sounds simple, but mixed with the near-payola of Spotify’s playlist culture and Pandora’s “steering” deals, it’s really not.  Negotiating leverage allows big stakeholders to tweak the basic calculation with royalty floors, advances (aka breakage), nonrecoupable payments that help cover accounting costs, and other twists and turns to avoid a pure revenue share.  All of which approximate a per-stream rate on a Rube Goldberg level, by the way, which is one thing these services seem to resist.

Cartoonist Rube Goldberg’s Automatic Back Scratcher

It’s pretty safe to say that all new artists get hosed on streaming royalties.  Setting aside the fact that your distributor will never get all the goodies that the big labels get in their deals, this is because even if a fan listens to your tracks only for a month, well over 90% of that fan’s subscription payment is allocated to artists she didn’t listen to and may not even like.  Of course all these machinations happen behind the scenes.  Fans are not usually not aware that their subscription pays for music they don’t listen to and artists they never heard of or don’t care for.   Plus, it’s virtually impossible for any label, digital distributor or publisher to tell an artist or songwriter what their per-stream rate is or is going to be.

Revenue share deals for big stakeholders have some bells and whistles that leverage can get you, like per-subscriber minimums, conversion goals, top up fees, limits on free trials, cutbacks on “off the top” revenue reductions, and the percentage of revenue in the pool (50%—60%-ish).  Even so,  the basic royalty calculation in a revenue share model is essentially this equation calculated on a monthly basis:

(Net Revenue * [Your Streams/All Streams])

Or ([Net Revenue/All Streams] * Your Streams)

In other words all the money is shared by all the artists.

Sounds fair, right?

Wrong.  First, all artists may be equal, but on streaming services, some are more equal than others.  Regardless of the downside protection like per-subscriber or per-stream minima, the revenue share model has an inherent bias for the most popular getting the most money out of the “Big Pool.”  (This is true without taking into account the unmatched.)

And of course it must be said that the more of those artists are signed to any one label, the bigger that label’s take is of the Big Pool.  So the bigger the label, the more they like streaming.

Conversely, the smaller the label the lower the take.  This is destructive for small labels or independent artists.  That’s why you see some artists complaining bitterly about a royalty rate that doesn’t have a positive integer until you get three or four decimal places to the right.  Why drive fans away from higher margin CDs, vinyl or permanent downloads to a revenue share disaster on streaming?  Because it’s all the rage.

Yet it increasingly seems that we are all stuck with the nonsensical streaming revenue share model with ever-declining per-stream rates.  Why is the rate guaranteed to decline?

If the month-over-month rate of change in revenue (the numerator) is less than the month-over-month rate of change in the total number of streams or sound recordings streamed on the service (the denominator), the per-stream rate will decline over those months.  This is because there will be more recordings in later months sharing a pot of money that hasn’t increased as rapidly as the number of streams.

As the number of recordings released will always increase over time for a service like Spotify that licenses the total output of all major and indie labels (and independent artists), it is likely that the total number of recordings streamed will increase at a rate that exceeds the rate of change of the net revenue to be allocated.  If there are more recordings, it is also likely that there will be more streams.

So streaming royalties in the Big Pool model will likely (and I would say necessarily will) decline over time.  That’s demonstrated by declining royalties documented in The Trichordist’s “Streaming Price Bible” among other evidence.

 

There is a move afoot to switch to a “user centric” model of revenue share allocation that rewards the artist with a share of everyone who listens to them.  I have a version of that concept I call the Ethical Pool.  But the simplest approach would be to abandon the revenue share model altogether and negotiate a per-stream royalty–unfortunately, no one seems to be interested in the simplest approach.

For our purposes, just understand that regardless of what you hear about streaming saving the industry, streaming is unlikely to save you.

 

20 Questions for New Artists Part 4: Band Administrator, Split Sheets and Co-Writer Agreements

May 15, 2019 Comments off

For the next few weeks, we’re going to post sections from the article “20 Questions for New Artists” by Chris Castle and Amy Mitchell some of which has been posted various places. This doesn’t constitute legal advice, or any intent to form the attorney-client relationship. Chris, Amy and others will also be publishing occasional excerpts from the “Artist Glossary of Industry Terms” as a companion guide.

Band Administrator

It is a good idea for one band member to take responsibility for keeping track of the papers and information relating to the band’s business, such as receipts, bank statements, credit cards, payments, approvals for licenses, etc. This is especially important if there is no manager involved with the band.

It’s a bad idea if this “managing member” has too much latitude to go off the rails–which in this case means run up bills, take on other debt, disappear with the money.   The “managing member” must keep the other band members informed, and should not be able to assume any liabilities or sign any contracts on behalf of the band without written consent of the other members and giving them a chance to read and understand what it is they are signing up to.

The duties and authority of this person need to be clearly spelled out and understood.    This is the kind of thing that is addressed in a band partnership, shareholder or LLC operating agreement (and you may well be forming a “de facto” partnership as it is), so we will reiterate the importance of having the band agreement drafted by a lawyer.

Split sheets

Song splits are probably the most sensitive conversations that the band has together. Some professional songwriters take split sheets into each writing session and at least get all the co-writers to sign off on the split sheet and  at least register the song with their PRO when the song is completed. This is another one of those discussions that are better had before the band is making money to avoid the “selective memory disease” and can help if the band (or any member-writer) is ever accused of copyright infringement in connection with a song.

Song splits become especially important if you are writing with “outside writers” such as a record producer who may bring beats or a singer who brings a top line, or even just a producer who helps to shape the song as well as the recording.

Whenever you co-write with someone not in your band (which could be a producer or another songwriter) there are some issues you have to be concerned about. Some of this may be a little too complex legally for most people to try on their own, but we will assume that if you have a record deal (which is when most of these issues come up) you will already have a lawyer or manager to help you. These are not all the issues involved, but if you cover all of them you will avoid a good deal of agita later on.  Your lawyer should be able to help you get song split agreements drafted.

1. Splits: It seems obvious, but make sure there is no dispute about who wrote how much of the song.

2. Videos: You will need to be sure that the co-writer agrees to whatever terms are in your record deal that cover the synchronization license for promo music videos that are in your recording agreement. Assume that you’ll need to get a free sync license for promo music videos. “Promo music videos” can include YouTube which is technically a commercial exploitation but which throws off so little revenue that is may as well be promotional. You do not want to wake up and find out that you have to pay a sync license for a promo video.  One way to refer to this is “a free sync license for promotional or “YouTube-style” music videos”.

3. Controlled Compositions:

Record companies must license the right to sell reproductions of songs in records (or what the Copyright Act defines as “phonorecords”).  The Music Modernization Act’s revisions to the mechanical licensing section of the Copyright Act now treats record company mechanical licensing differently than digital music service mechanical licensing but does not change the rules applicable to controlled compositions.

Record companies (and I use the term broadly to include any distributor of phonorecords) typically will negotiate the maximum mechanical royalty rate that they must pay on records they release. These terms apply to songs written, owned or controlled by the recording artist.

These special terms are found in a clause in the recording artist agreement which is called the “controlled compositions clause.” The terms typically will include a maximum cap, a reduced mechanical rate applied as a percentage of a fixed rate and a limitation on the types of records for which a mechanical is paid. For example, a maximum album rate of 10 times ¾ of the minimum statutory rate on the date of delivery of the record concerned applied to sales of records for which an artist royalty is also paid would be a fairly customary (and low) controlled compositions rate.  (These reductions typically do not apply to digital reproductions.)

Very often digital distributors and some indie distributors will require that gross monies paid for digital downloads or physical record sales are inclusive of mechanical royalties.  This is not true of streaming, where the streamer (like Apple Music) pays the mechanical separately.  The Music Modernization Act created a blanket license for streaming mechanicals and gave the streamers a retroactive safe harbor on unlicensed uses that were the subject of David Lowery and Melissa Ferrick’s class action lawsuit against Spotify and David Lowery’s separate class action against Rhapsody over unlicensed songs and unpaid mechanicals.

Controlled compositions clauses do not apply to sales in the world outside of the United States and Canada, and even in the United States and Canada there have been developments that reduce the effects of certain controlled compositions clause provisions, especially for digital sales.  Controlled compositions clauses must be carefully negotiated.

If you are an artist signed to a recording agreement with a controlled compositions clause, you want to be sure that your co-writer accepts all the terms that apply to you. If you are the unsigned co-writer, be sure you understand all the terms of the controlled comp clause that apply to your song. You can ask for a copy of the “redacted” clause from the artist contract (and artists who do a lot of co-writing should have a digital copy of this clause ready to send out as it is a fair request).

4. Demo Ownership: Make sure you are clear about who owns the copyright in demo recordings. Remember—there are two copyrights in each sound recording, the sound recording itself (the demo) and the song that’s recorded (that you are co-writing). If you are the featured artist, you want to own 100% of the sound recording copyright in the demo. The percentage ownership of the demo and the percentage ownership of the song are two very different things and the ownership shares are independent of each other. Just because your cowriter owns 50% of the song doesn’t mean the cowriter owns 50% of the recording. This will become important if you use a pitching service for film and TV placements (“syncs”) and the licensee wants to use the recording of the cowrite. If you are signed to a record company, the record company will technically own the demo (or will take the position that they do).

5. Other Sync Licenses and Pitching: Aside from music video syncs, there is a whole world of film and TV licensing as well as advertising opportunities. These often require servicing a recording of your song to the film and TV supervisors or creatives at advertising agencies.

There are people who operate these pitching services, and major labels (at least theoretically) do it themselves. If you co-write with a writer who either has a pitching deal or a record deal, you need to have an understanding of who can pitch the song and who can approve synchronization licenses. If you are the featured artist, you will want to have some control over who is pitching the song because if your co-writer pitches the song for a use you do not want to approve, that can create confusion in the film and TV licensing community and may result in your not getting considered for future syncs that you do want. (The conversation with the co-writer will go something like this: “Want do you mean the artist won’t approve it? YOU PITCHED IT TO ME!”)

You will also need to have a clear understanding with any outside writers of  how pitching services your co-writer has contracted are compensated.  This can involve “retitling” or giving up a share of publishing.  Your share of songs should not be subject to those pitching agreements unless you separately decide to accept the terms, but you must, of course, know what the terms are before the fact.  We’ll cover these agreements separately.

6. Creative Commons: As usual, you have to be very careful not to write with anyone who intends to make your co-written song available under any kind of a “Creative Commons” license. The “CC” license does not work very well for professional songwriters, mostly because it is very poorly drafted and it is effectively irrevocable. See “Carefully Co-Writing Without Creative Commons” (by Chris Castle), Public Licenses: The Gift that Keeps on Giving (by Prof. Jane Ginsburg), Common Understanding (by ASCAP’s Joan McGivern)

 

See also:  20 Questions for New Artists Sidebar: The Importance of Metadata

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where Was the Board? Some Thoughts on Potential Legal Issues in Pledge Music “Administration” Bankruptcy–Artist Rights Watch

May 13, 2019 Comments off

[This post first appeared on Artist Rights Watch]

We’ve had a lot of questions about what is going on with the Pledge Music crowdfunding platform which appears to be either on its way or already in a bankruptcy filing according to reports.  This post will be a few thoughts about the current situation which is evolving.  This is not intended as legal advice and if you’re involved in the Pledge situation you need your own lawyers and you need them right now.  Consult your local state bar association (in Texas, that would be www.texasbar.com)  Don’t ask me questions in the comments as I won’t be able to answer them, so I’m afraid this is a one-way communication.

If this is all news to you, that’s understandable because if you go to the company’s website, there’s no indication that anything is amiss, which I find to be just downright bizarre in and of itself.  Normally what one would expect is that there would be some conclusive message blazoned across the landing page, but there’s nothing.

There certainly would not be testimonial endorsements from artists who are blasting the company which arguably qualifies as false advertising even if the site as a whole does not.

Pledge Landing Page 5-11-19

This lack of communication is, unfortunately, fast becoming what I find to be the hallmark of Pledge Music’s waning days, days which have been waning for a long time now.  I’m not a bankruptcy expert but one thing I can say from experience is that companies typically do not get into bankruptcy overnight and the seeds of their destruction often go back many months if not years.  In fact, those seeds are often found in the basic business plan.  So don’t let nostalgia allow you to let anyone out of their responsibilities and don’t let anger cloud your judgement.  Easy for me to say, I know.

Which Kind of Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy in a common language sense comes in two flavors:  liquidation and reorganization.  In liquidation bankruptcy the company ceases operations, the company’s assets are sold off, the proceeds used to pay creditors (including employees in some cases), and that’s the end of it.

In reorganization, it’s literally what it sounds like.  The company intends to keep operating (often with the same management as incredible as that may sound) and it reorganizes its finances, pays off creditors as best it can, and then re-emerges on the other side with a new balance sheet and having dealt with (some might say shirked) its obligations.  iHeart is a prime example of how artists and songwriters get screwed in reorganization bankruptcy.

It would be nice if Pledge had at least made a clear statement about what its future intentions are–like you know, on its website–but I don’t think we know definitively today.  It sounds like they’re liquidating.  I saw a lot of that in the Dot Bomb era when “entrepreneurs” burned through the investors money, ran the company into the wall at 100 mph and then flipped the keys to the first bum on the street.  A bit harsh, but that’s essentially what was happening all the time in the Silicon Valley testing range.

The difference is that they did it with the investment from sophisticated investors.  It’s looking more and more like Pledge did it with the artists and fans’ money at least in part.

Creditors

Creditors also come in two flavors and this is important:  secured and unsecured.  An example of a secured creditor is a bank that lends money to the company.  It appears that Pledge had a loan from one Sword, Rowe & Co. that may be secured.  There may be others.  We don’t know, but based on open source materials, it appears to be at least one entity that could be a larger secured creditor.  If it’s this Sword Rowe & Co., they are based in New York and Nashville and specialize in music industry lending.  The Bloomberg profile on a Sword Rowe & Company appears to be the same company, and it is a successor to Sword & Company, a New Jersey based investment bank of long standing.

Secured creditors typically will be ahead of practically everyone in the bankruptcy pecking order, and sometimes can essentially wipe out any available assets.

Another attribute of a secured lender is that they typically have the benefit of loan applications and due diligence to have a good look at the financial condition of who they are lending to.  So in the “what did they know and when did they know it” race of the rats running for the door, we have to think that a sophisticated lender would know or should have known of the company’s financial condition whenever they made the loan.  Of course, investment banks sometimes have private equity arms, so it may not be the case that Sword is a secured lender.  It seems inconceivable, however, that they did not know what was going on with the company at some point.

When is a Creditor Not Creditor

The big difference–at least to me–between the kind of creditor relevant to bankruptcy and the artists whose fans pledged money is that the fan did not intend to give money to Pledge for its own use.  I think it’s fair to say that the fan paid money to Pledge to hold the money in trust, deducting solely the agreed 15% commission to Pledge, conditioned on Pledge fulfilling all of its obligations.  Given the reaction online so far, I think that the reality bears this out.  Like I said, I’m not a bankruptcy expert, but I don’t know of any rule that allows a company or its officers and directors to take money “pledged” to a third party and paid to the company in trust, spend it on themselves without authorization from anyone, and then declare bankruptcy to get out of paying it back.

There is, of course, the practical question of where the money comes from to pay the artists as originally intended, refund pledges to the fans who paid the money in the first place, and also refund all or part of any commissions taken by Pledge.  Not an easy answer, but this is why “what did they know and when did they know it” becomes an important question in my view.  If it turns out–and I can’t see how it couldn’t–that someone in a position of authority at the company like an officer or director, or perhaps even a secured creditor, knew that the money was improperly handled and spent–much less even co-mingled with the company’s own money–that person may have the responsibility to pay it back 100 cents on the dollar to either the artist or the fans.

This is one reason why you have directors and officers liability insurance.  That insurance arguably provides another pool of money (assuming Pledge had the insurance coverage).  Crimes are excluded, of course.  It’s worth asking if the coverage was in place (sometimes required by investors or lenders) and explore if one could make a claim against it in good faith.

On the other hand, bankruptcy can be a complex and confusing process that has its own set of rules, so artists and fans may wish to determine how they can perhaps argue in the alternative that they can claim creditor status if they initially take a position that they are not creditors.  That status issue likely would have to be ruled on by a court, so getting the issue in front of a judge quickly will likely be of critical importance.

This is a complex area, so if you’re involved you need to get to a lawyer quickly.

Credit Card Refunds

Fans may be able to pursue a refund through their bank or credit card company.  There are often limitations on how long a card holder can wait to make a claim for an improper charge, sometimes 90 days.  This may explain why one of the few public statements that Pledge made was to ask for 90 days to put its house in order.  By delaying any refund requests for 90 days, the company may have hoped to preclude anyone seeking a refund.

However, consumers might be able to successfully argue to their bank or credit card company that they did not know conclusively that their funds were being misused until the day that Pledge announced it was going into bankruptcy in the UK, which was last week.  One could argue that the clock to disallow the charge did not start running until that time as the company’s public statements indicated that they might ultimately fulfill their obligations to the fan (or “pledger”).

If it turns out that there was fraud involved, the credit card company may actually become your ally as they will have been duped as well.

Law Enforcement Agencies

The scope of this meltdown suggests that law enforcement agencies may at least investigate what happened.  It may turn out that there’s no criminal dimension to the situation, but I don’t think it can be ruled out at this point.

If Pledge violated state consumer protection laws, federal bank or wire transfer rules, mail fraud rules or other criminal statutes, this could be a 51 jurisdiction issue in the U.S. regardless of the choice of law provisions in a click through agreement.  I suspect that law enforcement agencies may be reviewing the situation now.

Artist Rights Groups

So far the only artist rights groups to jump in on the Pledge situation are UK Music and the UK Musicians Union.  I know the Musicians Union has been monitoring the Pledge situation for quite a while to their everlasting credit.

The silence is deafening.

Austin Panel on The Pledge Music Crowdfunding Debacle

May 8, 2019 Comments off

You may have read Iain Baker of Jesus Jones story of the band’s encounter with Pledge that we posted here and hear.  You’ve probably heard the news that PledgeMusic is bankrupt as reported in Hypebot:

UK based corporate advisory FRP will be nominated to administer a court directed sale of all assets, which would be used to pay artists, merchant bank Sword, Rowe & Company and other creditors.

Digital Music News reports giving a chronology of the events leading up to what seemed the inevitable fire sale result of “new boss” syndrome:

Now, a leaked e-mail has revealed how bad things truly are for Rogers’ company, and for artists who depended on the platform.

“Please, please, please buy PledgeMusic!  But, don’t worry.  You don’t have to pay back artists.”

Earlier this morning, Digital Music News received an interesting e-mail from an anonymous source.

FRP Advisory LLP, a UK business advisory firm, has been named the proposed administrator of PledgeMusic.com Limited and its subsidiaries (dubbed ‘The Group’).

With a pre-liquidation fire sale set to take place, FRP Assistant Manager Robbie Wirdnam has now sought “expressions of interest in the business and assets of the Group’ – i.e., PledgeMusic.

By way of introduction, I’m part of the corporate finance team at FRP and assisting my colleagues in the restructuring team, as the proposed administrators of PledgeMusic, in the marketing of the Group’s business and assets.  As you have previously looked at the opportunity on a solvent basis, I’m circling back to determine whether you have an interest in the business and assets for sale, ahead of an administration process.” [“Administration” in the UK is sort of like bankruptcy.“]

Wirdnam explains that the British crowdfunding platform faced two ‘pressures’ which ultimately lead to its demise – working capital pressures and a lack of ongoing funding.

This is serious stuff.  There’s potentially millions at stake and thousands of people worldwide who will be harmed, not only the artists but also fans and vendors, producers and songwriters.

UPDATE: As Jem Aswad in Variety notes in “PledgeMusic Nearing Bankruptcy, Although Sale Talks Continue“:

It should be noted that a buyer of PledgeMusic would be taking on the debts owed creditors, which include artists who launched programs with the company and owed money, which is estimated to be as much as $3 million total (here’s a small list of how much certain artists were owed, as of February). As the company has demonstrated in the past, tends to go to the most prominent, or at least the loudest, artists affected.

Hypebot also has a story on the FRP situation “Pledge enters pre-administration as buyer deliberates”:

UK based corporate advisory FRP has been named to contact potential buyers and value the company’s assets in pre-administration; while in parallel, the interested buyer finishes due diligence.

If no buyer steps forward within the week, PledgeMusic will likely enter Administration with FRP as the proposed administrator.

If you’re in Austin, Chris Castle is moderating a panel about Pledge with Jesse Moore and Peter Ruggero, two bankruptcy law experts.  The panel is co-hosted by the Austin Bar Association Entertainment & Sports Law and Bankruptcy sections  and titled “The Pledge Music Crowdfunding Debacle” on May 22.  Here’s the event description:

The panel will review the reported facts on the decline of PledgeMusic.com, a crowdfunding platform directed at independent artists, established artists with significant fan bases and labels.  PledgeMusic has taken in contributions from fans but has not paid out all or a significant portion of those funds to the artists for over a year. Many Texas consumers, artists and vendors have been affected by the company’s collapse.

The panelists will analyze the effects of this collapse on artists, the rights of consumers and vendors and the potential future outcomes if the company does not solve its financial crisis and seeks protection of the insolvency and bankruptcy laws.

As far as we know, this is the only response from the legal community so far.  Chris tells us that it is directed at artists, fans and vendors as well as lawyers.  $5 covers pizza and parking.

Deets are:

Wednesday, May 22, 2019
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM CDT

Austin Bar Association
816 Congress Avenue, Room # 700
Austin, TX 78701

 

 

20 Questions for New Artists Part 3: Insurance/Legal Names/DOB and Nationality

May 8, 2019 Comments off

For the next few weeks, we’re going to post sections from the article “20 Questions for New Artists” by Chris Castle and Amy Mitchell some of which has been posted various places. This doesn’t constitute legal advice, or any intent to form the attorney-client relationship. Chris, Amy and others will also be publishing occasional excerpts from the “Artist Glossary of Industry Terms” as a companion guide.

Insurance

Many bands overlook the importance of insurance, often until it is too late. Even if you don’t overlook it, many artists don’t fully understand why their coverage may be lacking. It is a very good idea for the band to meet with an insurance agent experienced in music industry insurance (we often recommend Doodson)  and get a report from that agent about the coverage the band has (if any) compared to what the agent recommends. In the early days, the band may not have sufficient monies to both get insurance and set up limited liability entities. We always recommend insurance in this case. At a minimum, the band should have commercial insurance on your van and sufficient coverage to protect against loss or damage to the band’s musical instruments (often different policies). If feasible, the band should also seek general entertainer liability insurance, which is an umbrella policy that covers artists above and beyond the typical automobile insurance and other common coverages. (Tip: Watch out for exclusions for thrown objects.)  You should also confirm which insurance programs might be available to you from you PRO membership (such as ASCAP’s insurance programs.)

Legal Names of Members

Each member should provide the managing member  or accountant with the member’s full legal name. This will be necessary for contracts, registration of copyrights, etc. It is a good idea to have a list of each member’s cell phone and email so you can give that to anyone who needs to reach the band, particularly on the road or in case of emergencies. If there are any sidemembers (i.e., “hired hands”), list them as well. This type of information can also help the band’s accountant spot red flags like the employee versus independent contractor issues.

Date of Birth and Nationality

It is important to know early on if any members are not of the age of majority in your stat so that if someone is under age, you will be prepared for any issues in your state relating to age of consent (usually for contracts) and employment law (performing in clubs that serve alcohol, for example). If the band tours out of state, you will need to consider these issues. Often this involves having a parent or guardian available to sign off on any written agreements. Many states have court procedures (particularly California) that can allow minors to have special rights to do business or make contracts, such as “emancipated minor” laws or “judicial ratification” of contracts. Do not assume that these laws apply to minors in your band without talking to an experienced labor lawyer familiar with your state (and any other states or countries you may be touring in). It’s also handy to have each member’s date of birth available for any copyright registration applications you file if required by the U.S. Copyright Office.

 

20 Questions for New Artists Sidebar: The Importance of Metadata

May 6, 2019 Comments off

[For the next few weeks, we’re going to post updated sections from the article “20 Questions for New Artists” that Amy Mitchell and I wrote a few years ago which has been posted various places.  This doesn’t constitute legal advice, or any intent to form the attorney-client relationship. (If you miss an installment, try searching this blog for “20 Questions for New Artists”.)  For new issues that should be included for new artists, we’ll be adding the “Sidebar”, and this is our first one on the important subject of “metadata’.]

“Metadata” is a generic term for “credits” or what is also called “label copy”.   It is–at a minimum–the song title, artist name and sound recording copyright owner for each track, but should also include the songwriters, side musicians and vocalists, the producer and, if applicable any remixers or mixers.  The “metadata” issue comes up every time you—or someone you authorize—upload your recordings or videos to a digital service, or your song information to ASCAP or BMI or your recording information to SoundExchange.  Any mistakes you make potentially stand in the way of your getting paid by those services or PROs.

We can’t emphasize enough how important it is that you are consistent in your metadata and that you make an extra effort to correct it if you see it is incorrect on any digital service.  These are burdens of time on artists and their managers, but correcting metadata is often at the bottom of the failure of a service to account to you for your royalty.

Any mistakes along the way can get magnified and may drag you into a Kafka-esque experience inside the room of mirrors in Dataland, where mistakes are always someone else’s fault, everyone is understaffed and the machines rule and are considered to be infallible.

Make sure you ask your distributor for their rules for metadata, often called a “style guide”.  In the meantime, you should read the iTunes Style Guide which is available from Apple at this link: https://help.apple.com/itc/musicstyleguide/en.lproj/static.html

There’s a lot of information there, but it is important stuff to know.  Remember—your ability to get paid may depend on the tender mercies of a data input clerk working at minimum wage who you will never meet and who probably does not care as much as you do about getting your data input correctly.  You need to make it as easy as possible for them to do their job right.  However you may feel about poorly paid data entry clerks, empathy doesn’t pay your bills.

 

 

Copyright 2019 by Chris Castle and Amy Mitchell

The Future of What Podcast: Article 13’s Potential Impact on the Music Industry

May 4, 2019 Comments off

Portia Sabin discusses the European Copyright Directive and the process that got the legislation passed in the European Parliament with Helen Smith of Impala, Crispin Hunt of Ivor Academy and Chris Castle.

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