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Help @RepJerryNadler Beat the Cartels because #irespectmusic

September 26, 2017 Comments off

Emmanuel Legrand posted a very informative piece in his newsletter about a speech by Rep. Jerry Nadler at the so-called “Music Biz Association” Music Biz Entertainment & Technology Law Conference Series in New York.

(Some of you may remember the “Music Biz Association” as NARM which is what it was called before it was taken over by representatives from the leading royalty deadbeats of our day: Facebook, Amazon, Spotify, YouTube and Pandora. In fact, the chair of the “Music Biz Association” is from Facebook, the industry leader in screwing artists out of royalties and their name and likeness rights, not to mention fake news.  YouTube parent Google and Pandora are both members of the MIC Coalition cartel that is an effort by Corporate America dedicated to screwing the world’s songwriters and artists through massive lobbying power.  Also known as The Anti-Music Biz Association.  Amazon and Spotify are also represented through their trade association the Digital Media Association which has opposed everything anyone has tried to do to better the lives of creators.)

Mr. Legrand tells us that Rep. Nadler noted the long list of critical creative industries legislation languishing in the Congress:  These include the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act (HR 1695) which is currently languishing in the Senate after having passed the House with a rip-roaring 378-48 after being opposed by proxies of Music Biz board members.  Nadler’s own Fair Play Fair Pay Act of 2017 (HR 1836) would close the terrestrial performance right loophole for sound recordings; [the CLASSICS Act (HR 3301) to get artists paid statutory performance royalties for pre-1972 recordings that The Turtles have had to sue over at great expense;] “…the Songwriters’ Equity Act, that would simplify the way music is licensed by performance rights organisations; [the Allocation for Producers (AMP Act HR 881); and] the PROMOTE Act of 2017 (HR 1914), which would allow performing artists to opt out of having their music played on the radio if the performing artist is not being paid an agreed-upon performance royalty.”

Let’s be clear about one thing–the real tragedy that would make us all look very stupid would be if after getting the Register of Copyrights bill passed overwhelmingly in the House–after dirty dealing by Representative from Google–the bill simply dies in the Senate because no one will bring it up for a vote or because Senator Wyden (D-Google Data Center) has a hold on it.  The one bill that actually got a vote and was passed by the Judiciary Committee and by the House–fails in the Senate?  

That result would no doubt be thrilling to the Music Biz Association board members from YouTube, Facebook, Amazon and Spotify if for no other reason that the snarky Librarian of Congress is very likely itching to appoint her own Register and give the gesture to the Congress and their little dog, too.  (This would be the Libraian of Congress who is permitting (and I think encouraging) mass NOIs to screw songwriters for the benefit of Amazon, Pandora, Spotify and Google.)

If that Register appointment bill doesn’t get a vote pretty soon, she just might do it, particularly if she got top cover from the MIC Coalition and the Internet Association (assuming the IA can take time away from their important work of protecting Backpage.com and saving the Internet).

And this is not to mention the latest atrocity from the MIC Coalition, the radioactive “Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act” (HR 3350).  That bill destroys statutory damages and attorneys fees awards in copyright infringement cases against special classes of members of the MIC Coalition cartel that appears to be attempting to fix songwriter and artist royalties–at zero by the look of it.  (And those Music Biz Association meetings should recite the antitrust prayer with special fervor given all of the interlocking boards involved and the dominant posistions of Facebook, Google, Spotify, Pandora and of course Amazon.  Someone might come looking.)  For a good summary of what’s wrong with HR 3350 (or as we call it, The Shiv Act) read this open letter by the Content Creators Coalition signed by artist members Melvin Gibbs, John McCrea, Tommy Manzi, Rosanne Cash, Tift Merritt and Matthew Montfort.

Since we’re not mentioning HR 3350, let’s also not mention Music Biz Association board members Amazon, Spotify, Pandora and Google’s millions upon millions of “address unknown” NOIs served on the Copyright Office pursuant to impenetrable filings that screw songwriters to the wall in no uncertain terms.  But wait…Spotify says there’s no such thing as a mechanical royalty….I’m so confused.

Mr. Legrand reports that Rep. Nadler is disheartened by the lack of effort behind these bills:

Nadler said that so far none of these bills have gathered any traction, aside from the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act, which was voted 27-1 by the Committee before the summer, to be then sent to the Senate where it is stalling.

Nadler added that Goodlatte will stay in his position for less than two more years so something has to happen this year, if anything.

“Time is the enemy,” said Nadler. “Someone has to be pushing and a lot of this stuff is not going through the Judiciary.” However, Nadler wondered whether Goodlatte would go for a comprehensive Copyright Bill that would become his legacy or opt for a selective number of individual bills.

Nadler, as one of the co-sponsors of the bill, would like to see [Fair Play Fair Pay] go through because, as he said, the USA is the only country alongside Iran and North Korea not to grant performance rights on sound recordings for music played on terrestrial radio. To explain he situation owners of sound recordings are facing at the moment, Nadler used the following image: “In a car you can hit three buttons. If you hit FM, music performers do not get royalties. If you then hit satellite radio, performers get a royalty, and if you then hit streaming, performers get a different royalty. It does not make sense.”

Rep. Nadler probably thought he was speaking to an organization that supported his efforts, and indeed in fairness many of the Music Biz Association members do.

However, at least four of the members of both the organization and its board of directors work for companies that have been actively trying to crush songwriters and artists for many, many years.  Pandora, for example, lead the charge against the retirees and the deceased on opposing paying Pandora’s fair share on pre-1972 royalties for sound recordings.  $300 million or so later, it is up to the Congress to fix this loophole.

It’s imporant to note that it takes two to tango–one reason this long list of bills hasn’t moved is because of efforts to stop each of them by companies on the Music Biz Association’s board or the lobbying groups these companies fund to avoid any breadcrumbs leading back to their house.  The MIC Coalition, for example, includes the National Association of Broadcasters who have used their lobbying power to crush artists for decades.

MIC Coaltion 8-15

And it’s not that these companies just oppose legislation to treat creators fairly, it’s that they have in large part formed the MIC Coalition cartel for that exact purpose.  These companies spend millions of dollars lobbying against our interests.  So while we cherish Rep. Nadler’s unflagging support for songwriters and artists (as evidenced by the #IRespectMusic campaign and Blake Morgan’s extraordinary advocacy, for example), it must be said that the Music Biz Association is probably the wrong place to open the kimono because you never know which royalty deadbeat is taking notes in the audience and yukking it up under their breath.

Want to do something about it?  Call your Member of Congress at (202) 224-3121 (or find them on this list for a direct line in the House) AND call both your Senators at (202) 224-3121 (or find them on this list for a direct line in the Senate).  You can also write to your Member by looking them up on the House of Representatives website or to your Senators by looking them up on the Senate website.  (Remember–you have one Member of Congress and two Senators.)

Let’s help our friends like Rep. Nadler defeat the cartels.  Make those phone calls.

IRMAIV Large

 

An Update from Dr. Robert Epstein

September 25, 2017 Comments off

I was pleased to have this comment from Dr. Robert Epstein on Google’s ability to throw elections through manipulation of its algorithm, not to mention Google’s ability to control public opinion about Google itself.   We posted his comment but wanted to call to your attention in its own post as an update on his important work:

Thanks for your interest in my research. I just thought you should know that we’ve gone way, way beyond where we were back in 2013. See, for example, http://bit.ly/1REqzEY or http://aibrt.org/index.php/internet-studies. The search engine is by far the most powerful mind control machine ever invented. See my 2016 essay, “The New Mind Control” here: https://aeon.co/essays/how-the-internet-flips-elections-and-alters-our-thoughts

 

Sheryl Sandberg is shocked, shocked that there is bad behavior on Facebook

September 24, 2017 Comments off

This has been a bad few weeks for two out of the four members of the FANG cartel–Facebook and Google.  Their problems can all be summed up in a post by former Googler and current Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg–yes, that Sheryl Sandberg, who is a leading contender for beatification by the Congregation for the Causes of the Commercial Saints and former defendant in the Google shareholder derivative suit over Google’s violation of the Controlled Substances Act.

According to Ms. Sandberg:

Last week we temporarily disabled some of our ads tools following news reports that slurs or other offensive language could be used as targeting criteria for advertising. If someone self-identified as a ‘Jew-hater’ or said they studied ‘how to burn Jews’ in their profile, those terms showed up as potential targeting options for advertisers.

Seeing those words made me disgusted and disappointed – disgusted by these sentiments and disappointed that our systems allowed this.

Could the problem be that Facebook’s “systems” are designed to “allow this”?  Just like Google’s “systems” were designed and optimized to allow selling advertising keywords for pirated recordings derived from artist names?

Luke Sample

And as was demonstrated by the FBI and Department of Justice sting operation, Google perfected selling search terms for illegal drugs?  As Wired reported in 2013, Sheryl Sandberg is no stranger to the issue of state of the art “systems” mysteriously allowing bad acts:

At one point during a meeting with [then inmate and former online illegal drug impresario David] Whitaker and his lawyer, the Feds asked him how he had grown his online enterprise. Whitaker’s answer was immediate: He had used Google AdWords. In fact, he claimed, Google employees had actively helped him advertise his business, even though he had made no attempt to hide its illegal nature. It was reasonable to assume, Whitaker said, that Google was helping other rogue Internet pharmacies too.

If true, this would be a bombshell. This was Google, after all. Since its founding, the search giant had prided itself on being a different kind of corporation, the “don’t be evil” company. And for almost as long, its open-to-all-comers ad policy had come under scrutiny. Online pharmacies were a particular sticking point; in 2003, three separate congressional committees initiated inquiries into the matter.

On July 22, 2004, a month before Google went public [and she cashed out big time], Sheryl Sandberg—at the time Google vice president of global online sales and operations—testified before the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Legislators had proposed two bills that would regulate online pharmaceutical sales, but Sandberg argued that the measures would be unduly burdensome. [Kind of like stopping child sex trafficking–too much trouble for elites in the Internet Associations membership.] She said that Google employed a third-party verification service to vet online pharmacies. She also described Google’s own automated monitoring system and the creation of a team of Google employees dedicated to enforcing all of the company’s pharmaceutical ad policies. “Google has taken strong voluntarily [sic] measures—going beyond existing legal requirements—to ensure that our advertising services protect our users by providing access to safe and reliable information,” she testified. Neither bill made it out of committee. (Sandberg, now Facebook’s chief operating officer, declined to comment or be interviewed for this story.) [I bet.]

However–at the same time that Ms. Sandberg’s people were crowing about their verification service, other Googlers were selling advertising keywords to criminals selling illegal drugs into the United States.  Google subsequently negotiated a non-prosecution agreement (kind of like a plea bargain) pursuant to which Google paid a $500,000,000 fine, evidently with the approval of Eric Holder, then Attorney General of the United States.  Google was represented in that deal by one Jamie Gorelick (Amazon board member and former Deputy Attorney General in the Clinton Administration, replaced by…Eric Holder.  Ms. Gorelick is employed by Washington DC swamp powerhouse law firm Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale (former employer of Senator Elizabeth Warren).).

As Google (referred to as “the Company”) expressly acknowledged in the non prosecution agreement (which you can read here):

Non Prosecution Excerpt

So–Sheryl Sandberg has a very great deal of experience going back well over a decade with big rich Silicon Valley companies profiting from debased behavior.  Some might argue profits that she enjoyed herself in the form of stock awards, salaries and cash bonuses.

This is no doubt one reason why she was sued as a defendant in the stockholder derivative suit against Google (read the complaint here) that arose out of the $500,000,000 payment of the stockholders money to keep Google executives like her from being prosecuted criminally and potentially going to prison for facilitating the sale of illegal drugs to kids among other people.  (See also The Ryan Haight Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act of 2007, legislation sponsored by Senator Diane Feinstein and then-Senator now Attorney General Jeff Sessions.)

Remember–there’s no public evidence that I can find (and I’ve looked) that any of this bad behavior ever cost her a penny of her own money.

Shareholder Suite

Whether it’s drugs, hate groups, human trafficking or the Russians, Sheryl Sandberg has made lots of money exploiting human misery if you ask me.  I don’t quite see how she couldn’t have.

Given her carefully sanitized checkered past, should we accept the wringing of hands, wailing and mourning and rending of garments by an unimaginably rich power player like Ms. Sandberg?

I think not.  But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a different law for the Silicon Valley elites than there is for the hoi polloi.  Trust me, Sheryl Sandberg will never be held to account and will be able to buy her way out of prosecution yet again probably using the stockholders’ money yet again.

@maureendowd: Will Mark Zuckerberg ‘Like’ This Column?

September 24, 2017 Comments off
Emporer zuck

“It’s great when the emperor is Marcus Aurelius. It’s not so great when the emperor is Caligula.”

WASHINGTON — The idea of Mark Zuckerberg running for president was always sort of scary.

But now it’s really scary, given what we’ve discovered about the power of his little invention to warp democracy.

All these years, the 33-year-old founder of Facebook has been dismissive of the idea that social media and A.I. could be used for global domination — or even that they should be regulated.

Days after Donald Trump pulled out his disorienting win, Zuckerberg told a tech conference that the contention that fake news had influenced the election was “a pretty crazy idea,” showing a “profound lack of empathy” toward Trump voters.

But all the while, the company was piling up the rubles and turning a blind eye as the Kremlin’s cyber hit men weaponized anti-Hillary bots on Facebook to sway the U.S. election. Russian agents also used Facebook and Twitter trolls, less successfully, to try to upend the French election.

Read the post on The New York Times

Professor Goldman Puts His Finger on the Problem With the CDA Safe Harbor for Sex Trafficking

September 21, 2017 Comments off

The Senate Commerce Committee held hearings this week on amending the tech industry’s safe harbor in the Communications Decency Act that protects pimps and other human traffickers who use the Internet to facilitate child rape.  As became apparent in the hearing, the Internet Association (aka Google) is very much opposed to any change in its safe harbor protection.  (Big Tech’s main safe harbors (aside from having the money to beat the litigation bejesus out of anybody including governments) are Section 230 of the Orwellian Communications Decency Act and the safe harbors in Section 512 of the Copyright Act often called the “DMCA” or the faux “DMCA license.)

One less obvious issue of great importance in Senator Portman and Senator Blumenthal’s bill (S.1693, The Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act of 2017, called “SESTA”) is amending CDA 230 to permit state prosecutors from bringing criminal complaints (and victims from bringing civil complaints) under the duly enacted laws of their states.  This gives Big Tech considerable pause because The Little People (aka their users who make them rich) might be more likely to have their day in state court for these bad acts.

Let’s be clear–even if this were a 51 jurisdiction issue, the state laws aren’t going to be that different or complex.  The state would prosecute Pimp X for selling Jane Doe into child sex slavery which is bad.  The state prosecutors have to prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt.  On the civil side, a parent like Ms. Ambrose (who testified at the hearing) could bring a case because her child was trafficked and murdered.  She’d still have to win her case based on the applicable evidence standard, carry her burdens and overcome any affirmative defenses, as would living victims who sue for their harms.

These elements are unlikely to vary much from state to state.

Given the unimaginable number of these cases that occur every hour of every day and mostly online, it is just too vast a problem for federal prosecutors to shoulder alone.  Indeed, state prosecutors have a duty to bring cases under their state’s laws but perps can get away with their depraved oppression of young women and men by conducting their business online where prosecution is less likely to occur.  Courts block state law prosecutions because the federal law has been interpreted to pre-empt any state prosecutions.  The SESTA legislation would fix this loophole.

So why wouldn’t we want our children to have all the help they can get?  Why wouldn’t we want state prosecutors to be able to make these cases and why would we want the pimps to be able to hide in the shadows of the oxymoronic Communications Decency Act?

Thank goodness we have Professor Eric Goldman to enlighten us in this exchange (at about 1:42:00) with Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV):

SENATOR CORTEZ MASTO

MR. GOLDMAN, I’VE ONLY GOT ABOUT 1:26 LEFT. I UNDERSTAND YOU HAVE CONCERNS WITH STATES HAVING THAT AUTHORITY. I ASK WHY.

PROFESSOR GOLDMAN

CORRECT. THANK YOU. SO THE QUESTION IS WHY DO I HAVE TO THE RESERVATION THAT STATE ATTORNEY GENERALS ENFORCING THE LAW, THERE ARE TWO DIFFERENT ISSUES IN THE BILL. ONE IS THE BILL WOULD AUTHORIZE STATE CRIMES TO BE NEWLY ENFORCED IN ADDITION TO FEDERAL CRIME, THERE’S SOME OVERLAP BETWEEN THE TWO. NOW, WE OPEN UP THE DOOR TO A WHOLE BUNCH OF NEW LAWS NOT PREVIOUSLY ENFORCED AGAINST THE INTERNET COMMUNITY. THOSE LAWS HAVEN’T BEEN APPROVED BY THE REST OF THE INTERNET, EFFORT TO IMPOSE THESE OTHER CRIMES ON THE REST OF THE INTERNET CREATES A POSSIBILITY THE STATE ITSELF, THE PEOPLE THAT AREN’T IN THAT STATE ARE HAVING THE LAWS APPLIED AGAINST THEM IN WAYS THEY MAY NOT HAVE HAD A CHANCE TO VOTE ON….

So glad he cleared that up.  The Internet hasn’t approved state laws against child rape, so the 50 state attorneys general who back the SESTA legislation can go pound sand.  You know who also didn’t get to approve either the state or federal laws against human trafficking?

Desiree Robinson, the daughter of witness Yvonne Ambrose.  She was 16 and she was  trafficked, raped and murdered. She never got to vote.

So forgive me if I don’t shed a tear for whether “the Internet” approves of laws that would call Desiree Robinson’s abusers to justice.

As her mother told the Committee:

Be the change you want to see in this world. Not only for justice for Desiree, but for all the countless Jane Does out here and the other little girls to come who don’t have a voice. We have to be the change now to protect our babies from websites like backpage.com that open the door for predators without any accountability.

@KRSfow: Future of What Podcast on the Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act

September 16, 2017 Comments off

Episode #94: Recently, a bill was introduced by Republican congressman Jim Sensenbrenner which calls for the creation of a comprehensive database of compositions and recordings. The “Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act” claims to make things easier for coffee shops, bars and restaurants who want to license music to play in their establishments. To many in the music industry, the bill seems like a wolf in sheep’s clothing with the potential cause big problems. On this episode we dig deep into the bill with Future of Music Coalition’s Kevin Erickson and attorney Chris Castle.

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Google Sends in the Shills to Dodge Appearing at @SenRobPortman’s Hearing on Stopping Human Trafficking

September 14, 2017 Comments off

U.S. Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a legislative hearing titled “S.1693, The Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act of 2017” (authored by Senator Rob Portman and Senator Richard Blumenthal).  The hearing will be at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, September 19, 2017–but Google and Facebook won’t be there.

Why?  According to the committee website:

S. 1693, sponsored by Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and 27 additional cosponsors, proposes amending Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act to create new legal liability for internet companies whose sites knowingly facilitate sex trafficking and other crimes through content hosted on their platforms. While it does not affect federal criminal liability, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act was written to protect internet platforms from civil and state criminal liability for content created by others, including liability arising from the actions of others who post unlawful content or use the platform for unlawful behavior.

As MTP readers will recall, Google has a long history of supporting human trafficking sites like Backpage.com through Google surrogates like the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Internet Association.  Sending surrogates works best when the people you are trying to deceive don’t figure out that you’re doing it.  Senator Portman isn’t fooled by shillery.  As reported in Politico:

Kevin Smith, communications director for Sen. Rob Portman , told MT that was less than ideal. “Senator Portman has made clear that companies that oppose this bipartisan bill should defend their position publicly and testify,” Smith said. “It’s disappointing that they chose to send up a trade association instead.”

Professor Goldman, a reliable defender of  Section 230, is also testifying.  Professor Goldman teaches at Santa Clara University–which received $500,000 from the controversial Google Buzz class action settlement.  I doubt that this payment had any direct affect on Professor Goldman’s views, however.  To his credit, he does not appear in the current version of the Google Academics, Inc. database, the definitive resource for Google-funded academics.

The incomparable Nicholas Kristof recently wrote an op-ed about Google’s sex trafficking problem in the New York Times:

Sex traffickers in America have the police and prosecutors pursuing them, but they do have one crucial (if secret) ally: Google.

Google’s motto has long been “Don’t be evil,” and I admire lots about the company. But organizations it funds have for years been quietly helping Backpage.com, the odious website where most American victims of human trafficking are sold, to battle lawsuits from children sold there for sex.

Now Google is using its enormous lobbying power in Washington to try to kill bipartisan legislation that would crack down on websites that promote sex trafficking.

It will be interesting to see if either the Internet Association or Professor Goldman tries to take the line adopted by Google lawyer Kent Walker (at the Google annual shareholder meeting) and try to get the Congress to believe that the Congress “was striking a blow for Good Samaritan review by Internet platforms” with CDA 230.  In other words, the Congress wanted to help Good Samaritans that are “quietly helping Backpage.com….to battle lawsuits from children sold there for sex.”

We shall see.  Live video will be on the Commerce Committee website.  You can call your Senator to express your views on the legislation at (202) 224-3121.

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