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Archive for October, 2017

Goliath Never Learns: Tone Deaf Google Takes Down a True Parody by Content Creators Coalition

October 31, 2017 1 comment

If you’ve ever heard some of the truly muddled gibberish from YouTubers or Facebookers justifying counternotifications after being hit with a copyright claim, you’ll know that what seems like 99.9% of them have no idea what a parody is (thanks in part to the unholy alliance of Google and its too close for comfort marriage to the Electronic Frontier Foundation).  So it’s particularly galling when YouTube actually takes down a real parody, and gall goes supernova when YouTube takes down a parody of…YouTube.  Yes, that’s right…dumb, dumber AND dumbest in the same place at the same time, a veritable threefer of dumbassery, or stupidity cubed.

Recall that the Content Creators Coalition produced a couple videos that parodied the main two issues that the creative community has with YouTube:  YouTube’s absurdly low royalties and YouTube’s absurd abuse of the DMCA safe harbor.  The videos are also a bit of an homage to Apple’s classic Mac. vs. PC ad campaign from 2006.

According to Richard Morgan writing in the New York Post, YouTube responded by unilaterally taking down the C3 videos because it violated YouTube’s terms of service.  MTP readers will recall that the fastest way to get a video of illegal drugs for sale, jihadi recruiters, pimp apps, war porn and a host of other nasty stuff is for me to post the video on MTP.  Little did I know that the same would happen to C3!

While videos of ISIS beheadings somehow slipped past YouTube censors, the video streaming site didn’t have any problems finding a playful ad campaign by some indie musicians — and promptly pulling the plug on it.

The campaign, called “YouTube Can Do Better,” featuring a “square” businessman as “YouTube,” was created by the Content Creators Coalition as an attempt to get the Google property to increase the ad revenue split with musicians.

The campaign’s lead spot, “Pennies vs. Dollars,” was uploaded to YouTube on Oct. 25 around 11:30 a.m. — and was pulled from the video-sharing site less than 48 hours later, the group, known as
c3, told The Post. YouTube said it pulled the video “due to violation of terms & conditions.”

The artist-led coalition, whose members include David Byrne, Roseanne Cash and T Bone Burnett, fired back at the Google unit within an hour.

“After two days of widespread press coverage of our artist-driven campaign to pressure Google into treating artists more fairly,” c3 complained, “you suspended and are now censoring our account.”

It really is true–Goliath NEVER learns.

 

Must Read: @zvirosen Critiques Florida Flo & Eddie Ruling: Another Season, Another Common-Law Copyright Opinion — Artist Rights Watch

October 30, 2017 Comments off

The Turtles state law case in Florida on pre-72 case against SiriusXM gets a road bump from a results-oriented decision from the Florida Supreme Court.

via Must Read: @zvirosen Critiques Florida Flo & Eddie Ruling: Another Season, Another Common-Law Copyright Opinion — Artist Rights Watch

The Google Toilet Redux: Humor for the Value Compromised

October 26, 2017 Comments off

HITS shows us that YouTube is the perfect medium for messaging about….YouTube.

C3 Uses Fire to Fight Fire — Artist Rights Watch

October 26, 2017 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez: What’s more fun than using Facebook to expose Facebook? What’s more fun than hosting a blog on Blogger to expose Google? What’s more fun is posting a video on YouTube exposing YouTube!]

via C3 Uses Fire to Fight Fire — Artist Rights Watch

University of Georgia Announces Blockchain-Free Artists’ Rights Music Conference With Actual Artists

October 25, 2017 Comments off

Terry College at University of Georgia continues to break ground with its Music Business program.   Today they announced an Artists’ Rights Symposium that looks to be free of product pitches, blockchain promoters, AI cultists, dull venture capitalists, tedious Ted Talks hedgehogs, and the other shifty carnies of post-digital music eventspace.   And someone must have forgot to consult the music conference handbook cause actual artists will be in attendance!

The Symposium subtitle “Who You Gonna Call” appears to be riffing on the most unusual aspect of the conference: attempting to pair artists with folks that have badges, subpoena power or access to other levers of state and federal power. Should be fun.

Mark your calendars Jan 22-23. Terry College of Business University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602.  Reception Jan 22 at The 40 Watt Club.  Open to public but seats limited.  Contact the Music Business Certificate Program for more information. 706-542-7668.

ARTISTS RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM
Jan 22-23
WHO YOU GONNA CALL?

An examination of resources available to music creators beyond copyright infringement lawsuits

The rapid change in the digital music industry has left music creators and music industry rights holders confused, unaware of the extent of their intellectual property rights, and often unable to enforce those rights. Traditionally music creators and rights holders have resorted to federal copyright infringement lawsuits to rectify these problems.  Unfortunately these lawsuits are expensive, time consuming and inefficient.  The purpose of this symposium is to examine other tools that are available to enforce music creators’ rights beyond federal copyright infringement lawsuits.

Some of the subjects that could be covered are strategies that rely on voluntary agreements; best practices; federal, state and local legislation; moral rights; human rights; international intellectual property agreements; trade treaties; antitrust enforcement; corporate responsibility campaigns; activism; consumer education; internet governance; and conspiracy statutes.

The organizers hope to bring together academics and practitioners with a wide variety of backgrounds including (but not limited to) copyright and entertainment law, technology, public policy, economics, law enforcement, journalism, activism and international relations.

Jonathan Taplin, author, manager, film producer and Director of the Annenberg Innovation Lab at University of Southern California has agreed to keynote the discussion and help moderate panels. Sandra Aistars directs the Arts & Entertainment Advocacy Program at George Mason’s Antonin Scalia School of Law and has also agreed participate as well.  Other confirmed guests include: artist advocates such as Blake Morgan (#IRespectMusic), Kay Hanley and Michelle Lewis (Songwriters of North America) and  legendary music producer T-Bone Burnet; state and federal legislators and staff; representatives from law enforcement; international relations and public policy experts; and various prominent academics.

The Symposium will take place over two days Jan 22-23, 2018.  Jan 22th will be an evening reception 7-9pm at The 40 Watt Club, January 23 will consist of 4 discussion sessions beginning at 9:30 AM.  The symposium panels will take place at 200 Moore-Rooker Hall, Terry College of Business, University of Georgia, Athens GA 30602.

 

@mekosoff: Silicon Valley’s Tech Gods Are Headed for a Reckoning How Facebook and Google became mercenaries—and now casualties—in the information war. — Artist Rights Watch

October 25, 2017 Comments off

Others in Silicon Valley described [and royalty deadbeat] Mark Zuckerberg as out of touch with reality, unaware of the damage his brainchild has done.

via @mekosoff: Silicon Valley’s Tech Gods Are Headed for a Reckoning How Facebook and Google became mercenaries—and now casualties—in the information war. — Artist Rights Watch

Mass NOI Charts: An Update from Royalty Claim

October 23, 2017 Comments off

An update on the state of the Copyright Office debacle also known as mass filing of “address unknown” notices under Section 115 (you can see the largely unusable posting of these notices at this link on the Copyright Office site).

Here’s some charts you won’t see in the trades or even on the Copyright Office site-Royalty Claim‘s Address “Unknown” Mass NOI chart that Royalty Claim measured by number of filings January 1-June 30, 2017:

[Preview] The State of Unclaimed Royalties and Music Licenses in the United States (3)

January 1-June 30 2017 by Number of Address Unknown Mass NOI Chart

And here’s another view by the millions of dollars of filing fees that Royalty Claim says has been paid to the Copyright Office (that is making a bundle out of the entire bureaucratic night sweat):

[Preview Fees] The State of Unclaimed Royalties and Music Licenses in the United States (4)

Mass NOI Fees Paid to Copyright Office Jan 1-June 30, 2017

Remember–the Copyright Office started allowing these filings in April 2016.  The inception to date totals are closing in on 50 million filings altogether–another chart the Copyright Office will never show you.

You can view the entire Royalty Claim presentation at this link.

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