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Archive for September, 2019

The DMCA Still is Not An Alibi: How is Google Search Like the Ford Pinto?

September 29, 2019 Comments off

Music Technology Policy

YouTube and Google are both fit for purpose, it’s just that the purpose is unfit.

The Pinto Gap

Google frequently defends what I would call the “Pinto Gap”–Google’s business practice named after the notorious Ford Pinto model with the exploding gas tank.  Why the “Pinto Gap”?  Because one would have to believe that Google has determined, just like Ford, that the cost benefit of programming their search algorithm to play whack a mole with artists profits them more than “doing the right thing.”  One day we may find out if there is a “Pinto memo” at Google.

Remember the Viacom case?  Of the few internal YouTube emails that Viacom was able to recover this one from YouTube co-founder Steve Chen sums it up nicely as reported by USA Today:

Viacom says Chen discussed in another instance how YouTube could handle a hot news clip from CNN

View original post 1,695 more words

@musictechsolve: Is Spotify Stock Quietly Tanking?

September 25, 2019 Comments off

UPDATE:  This post originally appeared on 9/24 in MusicTech.Solutions before reading that on 9/23 Wells Fargo initiated coverage of Spotify at “Underperform” with a $115 price target.  (The stock touched $115 during the trading day on 9/24).  As of this writing, the consensus price target is $159 according to NASDAQ’s Marketbeat.  And of course, streaming’s massive consumption of electricity is becoming an issue faster than you can say “data center.”

Analyst Mark Hake has developed three different scenarios for where Spotify’s stock price will be in 2021:  $125.68, $61.42 and $38.39.  He assigns a $114.89 price based on a probability analysis.  About where it is at the close today, in other words.  His post in Seeking Alpha (“Spotify Has A Valuation Problem”) is a must read if you’re interested in financial analysis.  (I predicted about a year ago the stock would retrace to the $120 to $130 range before dropping below $100 and that it would happen sooner than later.)

As analyst BNK Invest noted after the close last Friday (9/20):

In trading on Friday, shares of Spotify Technology SA (Symbol: SPOT) entered into oversold territory, hitting an RSI reading of 26.8, after changing hands as low as $120.63 per share. By comparison, the current RSI reading of the S&P 500 ETF (SPY) is 56.4. A bullish investor could look at SPOT’s 26.8 RSI reading today as a sign that the recent heavy selling is in the process of exhausting itself, and begin to look for entry point opportunities on the buy side.

This chart is from today’s trading and it reveals a couple interesting patterns–they may mean nothing, but then again they might.  It’s not so much that Spotify is now trading about $20 below its self-assigned private company valuation of $135.  That’s not a comfortable feeling as it says that investors would have been $20 a share better off if the company had never had its controversial direct public offering (or “DPO”) and just stayed private.

Spot 9-24

Intraday Trading on 9/24/19 Only

What’s interesting about this chart is not so much the price but rather the volume.  Spotify is a very thinly traded stock that typically has relatively low volume.  When you see larger volume around the opening and the close of trading it may indicate certain motivations of sellers.  Particularly if there are holders of large blocks of shares that want to slip out of their position when nobody is (a) noticing or (b) can do much about it.

Because of the nature and “rules” of the DPO, Spotify doesn’t have the typical underwriting syndicate that helps to keep the price somewhat stable to allow the stock to establish a trading range with support levels.  Instead of the underwriters selling to the public, Spotify insiders are selling their shares to the public, which then of course can be resold.  In an underwritten public offering, insider shares are usually subject to a “lock up” period where insiders cannot sell their shares for a period of time, say 90 to 180 days after the first public offering.

Spotify had no lock up on insiders.  So who has an incentive to sell their shares relatively quickly?

It’s hard to know who is doing the selling unless you’re a transfer agent with access to the master shareholder list, and they probably wouldn’t disclose that information for anyone under certain thresholds.  But it is odd and it’s been similar patterns for a week or so.

Spot 5 days 924

Dirty Data: Google’s Embarrassing #ClimateStrike Charm Offensive is a Lesson in Propaganda

September 22, 2019 Comments off

As any journalist can tell you (probably off the record), Google’s press police hammers the message of the day very aggressively.  We have a perfect example of those Googlely antics with their latest charm offensive on new data centers in Europe.

Here’s the headline from The Street, which is very likely actual reporting on the story:

thestreet google data centers in EU

Not a word in the story about “clean” anything, probably because the reporters know better and are probably insulated from Google’s press police.

But–here’s the same story from TechCrunch:

techcrunch google eu datacenters.png

This TechCrunch headline ran over a huge photo of wind turbines–which has little to do with the story which is not about wind farms but about data farms.  Data farms that hog huge amounts of electricity.

us-data-center-power-consumption

Google typically requires a state–or in the EU’s case a nation–to provide a mix of energy sources, about 1/3 of which Google would like to derive from “green” sources.  But not all.  However, the TechCrunch story makes it sound like the whole point of the data centers isn’t to hog electricity and crowd out local power users but instead for Google to somehow “answer the call” by climate strikers by doing something Google would have done anyway–when Google KNOW they are burdening the local power grid.

Google announced today that it was investing €3 billion (approximately US$3.3 billion) to expand its data center presence in Europe. What’s more, the company pledged the data centers would be environmentally friendly….

It’s obviously not a coincidence that the company is making an announcement related to clean energy on Global Climate Strike Day, a day when people from around the world are walking out of schools and off their jobs to encourage world leaders and businesses to take action on the climate crisis. Google is attempting to answer the call with these announcements.

Source: HPC Wire

 

It has been baffling to me how the Green New Deal proponents haven’t focused on Google as a major polluter and electricity hog.  YouTube alone snorts down about as much power as it takes to operate the city of Cincinnati every day–if not more.  It’s hard to get straight answers about Google’s power needs.  And then there’s Facebook.
Data Centers

It should not be lost on anyone that Google and Facebook gain major political clout from placing data centers in states or European countries.  Based on Google’s most recent environmental report (2018) you have to tease out what Google’s actual carbon emissions is (in footnote 32):

  1. Google emits less than 8 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per day to serve an active Google user—defined as someone who performs 25 searches and watches 60 minutes of YouTube a day, has a Gmail account, and uses our other key services.

In Google-speak “less than 8” usually means 7.9999999999.  So let’s call it 8.  As of 2016 there were 1 billion active gmail users.  So rough justice, Google acknowledges that it emits about 8 billion grams of carbon dioxide daily, or 9,000 tons.  And based on the characteristically tricky way Google framed the measurement, that doesn’t count the users who don’t have a gmail account, don’t use “our other key services” and may watch more than an hour a day of YouTube.  You know, like kids for example.

lux-research-data-centers-electricity-use

Nature magazine sums it up:

Upload your latest holiday photos to Facebook, and there’s a chance they’ll end up stored in Prineville, Oregon, a small town where the firm has built three giant data centres and is planning two more. [Hello, Senator Wyden.] Inside these vast factories, bigger than aircraft carriers, tens of thousands of circuit boards are racked row upon row, stretching down windowless halls so long that staff ride through the corridors on scooters.

These huge buildings are the treasuries of the new industrial kings: the information traders.The five biggest global companies by market capitalization this year are currently Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, Microsoft and Facebook, replacing titans such as Shell and ExxonMobil. Although information factories might not spew out black smoke or grind greasy cogs, they are not bereft of environmental impact. As demand for Internet and mobile-phone traffic skyrockets, the information industry could lead to an explosion in energy use.

According to the National Resources Defense Council:

Data centers are the backbone of the modern economy — from the server rooms that power small- to medium-sized organizations to the enterprise data centers that support American corporations and the server farms that run cloud computing services hosted by Amazon, Facebook, Google, and others. However, the explosion of digital content, big data, e-commerce, and Internet traffic is also making data centers one of the fastest-growing consumers of electricity in developed countries, and one of the key drivers in the construction of new power plants.

Why might that be?  Here’s some 2011 data from the famous “The Internet is Killing the Planet” infographic inspired by Greenpeace’s “Dirty Data” research (that seems to have been forgotten in the Green New Deal):

Google co2 1

Again from Nature:

Already, data centres use an estimated 200 terawatt hours (TWh) each year. That is more than the national energy consumption of some countries, including Iran, but half of the electricity used for transport worldwide, and just 1% of global electricity demand (see ‘Energy scale’). Data centres contribute around 0.3% to overall carbon emissions, whereas the information and communications technology (ICT) ecosystem as a whole — under a sweeping definition that encompasses personal digital devices, mobile-phone networks and televisions — accounts for more than 2% of global emissions. That puts ICT’s carbon footprint on a par with the aviation industry’s emissions from fuel.

heres-steam-shooting-out-of-the-dalles-data-center-in-oregon-as-its-cooling-down

What does this have to do with music?  Actually, more than you might think.  YouTube is one of the biggest carbon producers in the Google system.  What’s consumed the most on YouTube?  Cat videos?  How-to screw in a lightbulb videos?  No.

Music videos.

And then there’s streaming.  However you might have felt about plastic discs, billions upon billions of streams uses up a lot of processing power.  And it’s like all the world’s music is hosted in the cloud, sometimes literally.  Remember “Own Nothing, Have Everything”?  I don’t know if anyone could have thought of a more inefficient delivery method from a climate point of view, but I suppose it’s possible.

The fact is we are the forced enablers of what may end up being one of the biggest energy scams in the entire climate disaster, and it’s time to put the foot down.  First of all, artists need to start asking questions of services like YouTube and the advertisers who support them.

So when Google says they’re spending $3.3 billion on data centers in Europe, don’t think for a minute that the “call” they are answering is anything except the call for more profits and political clout.

And they will feed you all the propaganda they can to make you believe that they’re just good guys answering the call to save the planet.  Which is bunk.

The Coming Crisis: #SayNoToZoe on CASE Act Threats

September 17, 2019 Comments off

The new copyright small claims court legislation (The CASE Act) passed the House Judiciary Committee, but not without thuggery from Rep. Zoe Lofgren and the Internet Association. Chris Castle narrates the issues and proposes a solution for Big Tech’s “Senate strategy” that inevitably includes Senator Ron Wyden, the grifter from Oregon and proud father of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.  Lofgren’s threat comes about 8:27:00 on the YouTube video here.

Internet Association Statement on CASE Act

Michael Beckerman

Ron Wyden’s Teachable Moment: Should one Senator be allowed to stop 415 Members of Congress on the Pre-72 Fix

Did a Wyden Campaign Donor Fund Hedge Fund Operated Out of Senator’s Basement?

Are Data Centers The New Cornhusker Kickback and the Facebook Fakeout?

The Mother’s Milk of Algorithms: Google Expands Its Data Center Lobbying Footprint in Minnesota–Home to Senator Amy Klobuchar

ACLU takes a gratuitous swipe at the Copyright Office using a Google “study” to allege bias.  ACLU Statement on CASE Act

See: ACLU Gets $700,000 from Google Buzz Award musictechpolicy.com/2011/10/31/the-…r-the-company”/

ACLU Helps EFF With DMCA Delaying Tactics musictechpolicy.com/2010/07/07/aclu…laying-tactics/

ACLU Cribs from Google Lobbyists on Pro-Piracy Letter to Congress musictechpolicy.com/2016/05/04/why-…ns-from-google/

aclu cy pres

Guest Post: We are Not Blind to the Harsh Economic Realities of Streaming: An Interview with an Indie Publisher

September 15, 2019 Comments off

[Following is an interview with a reader who is an independent publisher about how they view the future for songwriters and independent publishers in the streaming upside down world to the right of the decimal place.  The publisher requested to remain anonymous.]

Chris Castle/MTP:  I want to ask you about challenges in the streaming reality for an independent publisher.  So, readers get the context, about how many titles are in your catalog and what responsibilities do you have as a publisher or administrator?

Publisher: Our companies were originally founded in 1958 in Hollywood at Vine and Selma. We control over 2100 recorded known songs collectively – in four main publishing firms – which also includes 35 administrated composer artist’s own publishing firms as well, worldwide. We handle all licensing, collection, royalty accounting, back royalty recoveries and sync licensing, inhouse. This we do for 46 years now.

MTP:  One of the threshold problems that I’ve seen with the way royalties are calculated for streaming is that the per-stream rate shifts from period to period which makes it impossible to tell a songwriter—let’s not forget about them—how much they are getting paid.  Do you find that’s an issue for publishers or am I making too much of that information gap?

Publisher: That information gap IS holding us down, we have no way to know HOW it’s calculated as it is and those calculations ABSOLUTELY are not making any sense, there is no explanation, continuity or pattern to deciphering the differences for each part of the service’s tiers – and the amount of units reported to support the varied rates, it follows no logic at all. It changes from period to period and often you’ll see 25,000 units on a Spotify Premium plan that PAYS nothing. WHY? We have no rights to audit and are helpless to question this with hundreds of thousands of excel statements that keep making LESS sense.  

The rates are always different and incomprehensible!

PANDORA (PREMIUM/ AND PLUS

RATE             UNITS               TOTAL 

 0.1667          44755               0.57303

.24368         19756.5             0.24368

 ITUNES MATCH AND FAMILY AND ITUNES MATCH

RATE             UNITS               TOTAL

 0.000027       964                   0.02

 0.000511      1323                   0.67

 0.00048       2816                  1.35

 0.00001       1345                   0.01

 0.000011    4832                  0.05

SPOTIFY FREE!? PREMIUM

  0.00020  4765                      0!

  0.000174 1441                      0!

[NOTE: The Music Modernization Act creates an optional audit right for the MLC to audit service once every three years.  Remember this is an optional right created in the Mechanical Licensing Collective–not songwriters–to audit services operating under the blanket license (unclear when that three year period starts running, but probably 1/1/21, so the first audit can start after 1/1/24).  Unclear how songwriters can require MLC to audit services, or if the MLC’s audit right applies to periods before 1/1/21.  MLC is also allowed to use an “alternative verification process” which doesn’t preclude a settlement without an audit.  MMA is unclear on how audit recovery is shared.]

MTP:  Along that same line, Apple proposed a penny rate of $0.00091 in the last Copyright Royalty Board rate setting (aka Phonorecords III, which is currently being appealed for other reasons by Spotify, Google and Pandora).  Do you think that a fixed penny rate would be easier or more difficult to calculate?  Apple’s proposal was rejected.  Was Apple’s rate more or less than you collect now?

Publisher:  Of course, accounting with a penny rate would be easier than these fractional mini pennies.  YES, it seems as though GETTING at least a penny rate per stream, would be SOMETHING at least, better than all the units practically accounted AS free goods! The rate rise promised in the MMA is still on the horizon, yet that certain MMA Copyright Act granted yearly increase HAS NOT arrived yet, not until 2021 AND because the still HOSTILE-to-Creators and GREEDY Streaming Companies – are Appealing it now.

MTP:  Under the current regime, how difficult is it to calculate songwriter payments for streaming?

Publisher:  It’s real hell, you do your best to get it, account it and pay it out but honestly, it’s not making any financial sense. The logistics over the last 6 years on its delivery by excel downloads is absolute insanity. You can do five hours of just taking it off of each excel Song line – 0ver to the Individual Writer statement, and after the hours of cutting it – you find the grand total of the WHOLE STREAMING check with 21,000 rows turns out to be $10.00! The accounting is so time consuming, and with its tiny micro pennies, too often is beyond heartbreaking seeing the endless devaluation of thousands of copies of your famous songs for so little.

MTP:  Would you say that on a per-songwriter basis it costs you more to administer songwriter payments than you make?  How about on a per-stream basis?

Publisher:  THERE is NO question whatsoever EXACTLY how much the cost of Administration has exceeded the EARNED revenue since Napster and file sharing became legalized as Streaming. We have been under siege with OUR COSTS and our Administrative workload heavier and harder – but digital LOSSES are still growing each month.

If you ACTUALLY compared it to the example of the mechanical days of CD Song units sold at 9.1 cents – (pre-streaming) the resultant digital sea change to streaming NOT CD sales – has actually cost us over $126,000 in losses of normal record income in 6 years. My accountant thinks its just crazy. In order to survive the expense of administrating and office overhead and more- we were driven absolutely to the wall at the end of December 2018 and forced to personally leverage (my own private shares of some very famous songs controlled by a big company). Yeah, a ten-year loan against this income that was supposed to be part of my retirement.

The venture capital investors are buying up Catalog like vultures preying on the Indies who have been hurt. It’s a part of the history of Songs and it’s a travesty. But this is what Streaming rates have done to the business of Music Publishing/Administration UNTIL those rates are raised to an equitable and fair market value number. We have had to work DOUBLETIME in doing film/tv sync licenses at a fast pace just to help supplement our streaming income. It’s terrible that we have to do all this while the Corporations use our Creations and profit, while we collectively suffer. I’ve had to spend my own savings to advance to Writers and Clients in hardship during these times because THEY come first.

MTP:  Spotify’s failure to match is a key issue in the recent lawsuit by Eminem’s publishers.  How has the matching been for you since Title I of the MMA went into effect?

Publisher:  IT’S A friggin nightmare, I don’t have the personal time to DO all of this MATCHING and reclaiming our titles THAT THEY failed to even LOOK for. IT’S SO UNFAIR to put this on us the Victims of their infringing our works. YET we have no choice now BUT to GET THEM FOUND, FILED and claimed under The Spotify settlement, and The Rhapsody settlement too, and HELP get those PENNIES back for our Writers and Publisher clients.

MTP:  If you could change anything about the current system what would it be?

Publisher: The three major labels who first invested in this scheme and enabled themselves to ELIMINATE the manufacturing costs, and put all the Masters in the vaults – and devalued the price of songs with these terrible streaming rates really represents THE Corporate take over of the Song Business as we knew it.  The only thing other than setting us free from this slavery and unfair business competition and constant bleeding loss of royalty value – IS – WE want a fair market streaming rate that will help restore our Writers and Clients to some kind of sustainability in order for them to be able to pay their bills and survive these terrible years of attack on their livelihood and income. Nothing less.  Will the MMA law now bring us to that remedy and healing, I surely pray it does?

MTP:  Is there anything you’d like to add?

Publisher:  I hope this article reaches every creative person who’s suffering privately and silently and helps to show them they are not alone, and we are not blind.  That is my desire. Hugs and thank you for making it possible. Even anonymously I give this..this truth, as solace to all of us trying to make sense of it all.

Rut Roh: @LibraryCongress Hoster Cloudflare Discloses “Incorrect” Submissions to Treasury Dept. Office of Foreign Assets Control For Blacklist Payments by Narcotraficante

September 12, 2019 Comments off

Cloudflare’s drip drip drip:  If we’re caught dealing with criminals it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

As reported by Mengqi Sun in the Wall Street Journal, 8Chan and Library of Congress hosting provider Cloudflare amends IPO documents on September 10 to disclose to the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control violations of U.S. economic and trade sanctions regulations by trading with terrorists and narcotraficante that have been blacklisted by the U.S. but paid money to Cloudflare. AKA blood money.

Isn’t it time for the U.S. Government to at least review any contracts with Cloudflare?  Sounds like a job for the Scooby Doo Gang.

Fortunately, #irespectmusic fan Rep. Ted Deutch was already on top of it and had questioned the wisdom of continuing that contract at a recent House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing.

As we all collectively gasp, ask yourself this question:  If Cloudflare has this problem–why doesn’t Google have a much bigger version of the same problem?

Here’s the except from the amended Cloudflare IPO document (Form S-1 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission):

We are subject to governmental trade sanctions laws, and export and import controls, that could impair our ability to compete in international markets and subject us to liability if we are not in full compliance with applicable laws.

Our business activities are subject to various economic and trade sanctions regulations administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and U.S. export control and similar foreign laws and regulations, including the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Export Administration Regulations (EAR). We incorporate encryption technology into certain of our products, and the encryption products and the underlying technology may be exported outside the United States only with the required export authorizations, including by license, a license exception or other appropriate government authorizations, including the filing of classification requests or self-classification reports. Further, the U.S. economic sanctions laws and export control laws include restrictions or prohibitions on the sale or supply of most products and services to U.S. embargoed or sanctioned countries, governments, persons, and entities. Even though we take precautions and have implemented policies and practices to assist in compliance, there is a risk that we may not be in full compliance with these laws.

In 2019, we learned that we may have failed to comply with certain U.S. export-related filing and reporting requirements and may have submitted incorrect information to the U.S. government in connection with certain hardware exports. Upon learning of these potential violations and associated export control requirements, we promptly initiated a voluntary internal review and are taking remedial measures to prevent similar export control anomalies from occurring in the future. In May 2019, we submitted a voluntary self-disclosure to the Bureau of Industry and Security regarding potential violations of EAR and a voluntary self-disclosure to the Census Bureau regarding potential violations of the Foreign Trade Regulations. These voluntary self-disclosures are under review by the respective agencies.

In May 2019, we submitted a voluntary self-disclosure to OFAC related to our non-compliance with certain economic and trade sanctions programs. Specifically, we identified that our products were used by, or for the benefit of, certain individuals and entities included in OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (the SDN List), including entities identified in OFAC’s counter-terrorism and counter-narcotics trafficking sanctions programs, or affiliated with governments currently subject to comprehensive U.S. sanctions. A small number of these parties made payments to us in connection with their use of our platform. Although we have implemented, and are working to implement additional controls and screening tools designed to prevent similar activity from occurring in the future, there is no guarantee that we will not inadvertently provide our products to additional individuals, entities, or governments prohibited by U.S. sanctions in the future. The voluntary self-disclosure is under review by OFAC.

Additionally, we currently provide products to certain OFAC-sanctioned regions based upon general licenses issued by OFAC to engage in such activity. We continue to review the OFAC sanctions and our practices to verify compliance.

These efforts related to export controls and OFAC sanctions could result in negative consequences for us, including costs related to government investigations, financial penalties and harm to our reputation. The impact on us related to these matters could be substantial.

In addition, various countries regulate the import of certain technologies and have enacted or could enact laws that could limit our ability to provide our products and operate our network or could limit our customers’ ability to access or use our platform and products in those countries.

If we are found to have violated the U.S. or foreign laws and regulations, we and certain of our employees could be subject to civil or criminal penalties, including the possible loss of export privileges and fines. We may be materially and adversely affected through penalties, reputational harm, loss of access to certain markets, or otherwise. Obtaining the necessary authorizations, including any required license, for a particular transaction may be time-consuming, is not guaranteed, and may result in the delay or loss of sales opportunities. In addition, changes in our platform, products, or screening process, or changes in export, sanctions, and import laws, could delay the introduction and sale of subscriptions to our products in international markets, prevent customers in certain countries from accessing our platform and products or, in some cases, prevent the provision of our platform and products to certain countries, governments, persons, or entities altogether. Any decrease in our ability to sell our products could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

@jameshanley5: ‘It’s a better way’: Deezer unveils User Centric Payment System ambitions #irespectmusic

September 11, 2019 Comments off

[Deezer is getting out ahead of the growing backlash against streaming service royalties with a blog post on the company’s site entitled “Deezer wants artists to be paid fairly.”  Deezer  becomes the first platform to commit to implementing a User Centric system (can we please not start calling it “UCPS”).  I’ll be interested to see their proposal in action.  Deezer does seem to have grasped the core issue of User Centric, whether it’s based on the ethical pool concept or otherwise:  There is no reason for the vast numerical majority of artists to stay in a system that results in fans paying for music they don’t listen to and an ever declining payout for those who are in it.  In the cold light of dawn, the science is in and the artists are out.

Streaming “Catalog” is any release older than 18 months–I cannot tell you how insane that is, but that is a topic for another day.  When you consider that “catalog” makes up a substantial majority of streams, it compounds the need for user centric royalty distribution instead of the current crisis.

Catalog Chart

And if songwriters were given a chance to abandon their legacy revenue share structure that they will be stuck with for years to come in favor of a penny rate as Apple proposed in the CRB Phonorecords III, they’d probably do it, too.]

[Deezer] CEO Alexis De Gemini said Deezer’s market-leading position in its home country had inspired the shift.

“We’re now a very important financier of the creation of music in France,” he said. “The streaming industry right now, through its paying system, generates more revenues towards specific genres loved by younger users, to the point that… important genres for people above 35 and 40 have their artists making less money than expected in the previous world, where each CD was sold, and the money was going artist by artist.

“We have started to take that mission to try and change the way the money is reallocated. It doesn’t have any impact on Deezer turnover in France, nor globally. But we believe it has an impact in the way we impact creativity, hence, the music we will bring to our users in the future.

“Just in France, UCPS is going to have the top streaming artists make, maybe, 10% less revenues. And on the other side, those who are making very weak revenues are going to be maybe making 30% more. We believe that this readjustment, which is tiny, can help a lot of artists who today are not getting any dime from the streaming business.”

Read the post on Music Week.

 

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