Archive

Author Archive

@KRSfow: Future of What Podcast on the Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act

September 16, 2017 Comments off

Episode #94: Recently, a bill was introduced by Republican congressman Jim Sensenbrenner which calls for the creation of a comprehensive database of compositions and recordings. The “Transparency in Music Licensing and Ownership Act” claims to make things easier for coffee shops, bars and restaurants who want to license music to play in their establishments. To many in the music industry, the bill seems like a wolf in sheep’s clothing with the potential cause big problems. On this episode we dig deep into the bill with Future of Music Coalition’s Kevin Erickson and attorney Chris Castle.

Subscribe to The Future of What on iTunes: apple.co/1P4Apk0

Follow us:
Twitter: bit.ly/2gOYMYM
Facebook: www.facebook.com/thefutureofwhat/
Instagram: bit.ly/1L6T8fl

 

Bruce Houghton: Why Didn’t Google Shut Down YouTube-MP3 Sooner? — Artist Rights Watch

September 7, 2017 Comments off

By many measures, YouTube streamripping became the #1 source of music piracy, widening the riff between the music industry and the online giant. But the shuttering of #1 ripper YouTube-MP3 came only after legal action from some injured parties – the major record labels.

via Bruce Houghton: Why Didn’t Google Shut Down YouTube-MP3 Sooner? — Artist Rights Watch

@luluyilun: Tencent Music Seeks Pre-IPO Funds at $10 Billion Value [for Music Streaming App]

September 5, 2017 Comments off

Tencent Music Entertainment Group, controlled by China’s biggest social network operator, is seeking new funding at a $10 billion valuation ahead of an initial public offering, people familiar with the matter said.

The operator of karaoke and Spotify-like streaming apps plans to sell about 3 percent of its shares to strategic partners, including record labels, one of the people said, asking not be identified as the details are private. Tencent Holdings Ltd., owner of the WeChat messaging service, held about 62.45 percent of the music group at the end of last year.

By forging an equity link with record labels, Tencent Music would be securing its right to hold on to vital streaming rights in China’s increasingly heated music market. Tencent spun out its music division after merging it with China Music Corp. to win over a larger slice of a domestic streaming market forecast to reach 4.37 billion yuan ($664 million) of subscription revenue by 2018.

The company, which competes with products from Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and NetEase Inc., is scooping up content to cater to users who turn to the web for entertainment and want services tailored to personalized preferences. Tencent Music has deals in place to distribute songs from artists including Beyonce and Taylor Swift after signing up with some of the world’s largest record labels, including Universal Music Group, Warner Music Group and Sony Music.

Some of the other most influential record labels for the China market include Huayi Brothers Media Corp. and Korea’s YG Entertainment, both of which have distribution deals with Tencent. Shares of Huayi Brothers rose as much 0.9 percent in Shenzhen while Tencent Holdings dropped 0.9 percent in Hong Kong.

Read the post on Bloomberg

@MykiAngeline: @The_WIMN: Front And Center: @SoundExchange Senior Director Of Industry And Artist Relations, @LindaBlossBaum — Artist Rights Watch

August 14, 2017 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez: A must read interview with a true artist rights advocate, Linda Bloss-Baum.]

Music has come a long way since the age of vinyl records and cassette tapes. It wasn’t that long ago when the only way to listen to music was either attending a live performance, tune in to your favorite radio station, or purchase hard copies from your local music store. Now with the ability to stream music from the internet, listening to our favorite artist is readily at our finger tips. Anyone with a laptop or smart phone can access almost any artist and song.

It also became increasingly harder for music artists to get paid for their creations.

This is where companies like SoundExchange come into play, working at the center of digital music to develop business solutions that benefit the entire music industry. As the Senior Director of Industry and Artist Relations, Linda Bloss-Buam ensure that artists and rights owners are aware of all the services that SoundExchange has to offer.

Below, Linda shares with us how she applies her experience and training in music policies and practices, and what she is doing to increase awareness of women in the music industry.

Read the interview on the Women’s International Music Network

@RobertBLevine_: Federal ‘Transparency’ Bill Endangers Songwriters’ Leverage for Getting Paid

August 12, 2017 Comments off

On the surface, at least, the “Transparency in Music Licensing Ownership Act,” introduced in the House of Representatives on July 20 by Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI), seems like a copyright bill that could help untangle the online music business….but the devil is in the details.

via @RobertBLevine_: Federal ‘Transparency’ Bill Endangers Songwriters’ Leverage for Getting Paid — Artist Rights Watch

@eriqgardner: Judge Rules KickassTorrents Founder Properly Charged With Criminal Copyright Conspiracy — Artist Rights Watch

August 7, 2017 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez–in a great day for artist rights, a federal judge rules that the KAT founder is properly charged under applicable US law.] For years, there’s been ample debate and scholarship on whether or not secondary copyright infringement constitutes a crime. On Friday, a federal judge in Illinois probably made the day of big […]

via @eriqgardner: Judge Rules KickassTorrents Founder Properly Charged With Criminal Copyright Conspiracy — Artist Rights Watch

@royaltyclaim CEO: Services are Spending $50,000 a week to file “address unknown” NOIs — Artist Rights Watch

August 3, 2017 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez:  $50,000 a week is $2,600,000 a year and that’s a whole bunch of streams.  Imagine if they just paid the damn royalties….]

Press Release Teaser: “DSPs are collectively spending an average of over $50,000 PER WEEK to file mass ‘address unknown’ NOIs under the Section 115 compulsory license provision of the US Copyright Act.” – Dae Bogan, Chief Researcher at Royalty Claim / CEO at TuneRegistry More facts to come out next week when he presents Royalty Claim’s report on the […]

via @royaltyclaim CEO: Services are Spending $50,000 a week to file “address unknown” NOIs — Artist Rights Watch

%d bloggers like this: