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Save the Date: Alissa McCain to Receive Cindi Lazzari Artist Advocate Award from TESLAW

November 10, 2019 Comments off

Alissa McCain will receive the 2019 Cindi Lazzari Artist Advocate Award from the Texas Entertainment and Sports Law Section (TESLAW) of the State Bar of Texas on November 20 at the InterContinental Stephen F. Austin Hotel.  Alissa has twenty years of dedicated and groundbreaking artist advocacy work that has had a substantial impact on the lives of thousands of artists across Texas.

A highly experienced and well-respected community leader, Alissa has maintained a singular focus:  the success and advancement of artists.

Her work at Texas Accountants and Lawyers for the Arts over the last seven years has provided both pro bono legal counseling to artists statewide in Texas and events and programs in all major cities in Texas.

In addition, Alissa was not only a founding board member of Capitol View Arts and working board member every year since its inception, she worked tirelessly as a member of the Austin Arts Commission to assist in re-working the funding metrics used to provide City of Austin grant money to help the smaller arts organizations receive their fair share of those funds.

Other notable accomplishments include her service as a Commissioner on the Austin Arts Commission (appointed by Council Member Ora Houston), a consultant and contributing writer to the Austin Music Census, COO of the Austin Creative Alliance, and Director of Programs and Operations for the Austin Music Foundation.

Alissa’s career embodies the traditions of the Lazzari Award — supporting and educating artists by creating the kind of resources that allow creators to thrive.  TESLAW will present the award to Alissa on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 6:15 P.M. at the Stephen F. Austin Hotel in conjunction with the welcome event for the 29th Annual Entertainment Law Institute hosted in Austin by the State Bar of Texas.

Alissa will receive a plaque created by renowned Austin Artist Rejina Thomas.

About the Lazzari Award:  The Lazzari Artist Advocacy Award is named for the late Cindi Lazzari, a leading Texas attorney who went far beyond the call of duty in her efforts to protect the rights of artists in the music industry.   It is awarded by TESLAW.

In these challenging times for Texas musicians, the Section wants to recognize the exciting heroes and heroines of all the music communities across Texas who carry on the tradition of Cindi’s good works.

Previous recipients of the Lazzari Award include Juan Tejeda (musician, arts administrator and activist), Robin Shivers (artist manager and founder of the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians), Texas Accountants and Lawyers for the Arts, SIMS Foundation, Nikki Rowling (co-founder of Austin Music Foundation and author of the Austin Music Census), Casey Monahan (the first head of the Governor’s Music Office) and Margaret Moser (the journalist and long-time music editor for the Austin Chronicle).

About the Artist: Rejina Thomas (African American Contemporary Artist) Circa 1979- present. Creative, Rejina Thomas has mastered her trades of Custom Glass Engraving and fabrication with mixed media including metal, stone, and plastics over the last three decades. Her acclaimed artwork is held in public places and private collections around the world.  She did all the double acid etch Victorian stencil pattern Glass Art in the Texas State Capitol.  Miss Thomas is also well respected as an abstract painter and muralist. Reji Thomas lives and works in Austin, Texas and continues every day to look at life through Abstract Colored glasses in order to see the best in Humanity.  https://www.rejithomasart.com/

Loophole Competition: Is Google’s News’ Richard Gingras the Counterpart of YouTube’s Lyor Cohen? via ArtistRightsWatch

October 14, 2019 Comments off

We’re all well aware of how Google uses self-manufactured loopholes in the DMCA safe harbor to enrich itself at the expense of artists, and run their loophole traps while appearing to “help” artists deal with the Google manufactured whackamole on YouTube with “tools” like Content ID.  (See Ellen Seidler’s teaching on this subject, Kerry Muzzey’s post about Content ID from an artist perspective, and Zoe Keating’s statements on the YouTube Content ID shakedown.)

What Google has also done is find someone out there who is willing to promote the corporate line on DMCA abuse, the Chief Loophole.  This person very likely gets paid a fortune in both cash and stock options to be the public face of Google’s destructive policies.  Or at least a fortune compared to the person’s former colleagues in the copyright category that Google is commoditizing and extracting value from with their loophole seeking behavior.

Google then spends money on a charm offensive directed at these former colleagues—but which falls short of providing the same wealth that they bestowed on the Chief Loophole.  They may have many reasons for keeping this class distinction in play, but the message is clear—if you truly go over to the dark side, beaucoup bucks await you.  Or it will seem like beaucoup bucks to you because Google’s loophole seeking beat you down so far it looks like up to you.

Yes, I’m describing Lyor Cohen at YouTube and Richard Gingras at Google’s Internet of Other People’s News.  Rather than embrace a rights-affirming and privacy-protecting philosophy, these two divisional Chief Loopholers shore up two of the principal sources of Google’s data wealth—news and music.

Lyor Cohen embarrassed himself to little effect as the face of YouTube’s assault on the European Copyright Directive.  Mr. Gingras is doing the same in what promises to be the opening act of a long offensive against the European Copyright Directive.

The Copyright Directive has been passed by a vote of the European Parliament and transposed into French law by a vote of the Parliament of France—which the multinational Big Tech bloc like Google lost abysmally by employing a bot strategy that seemed to be modeled on the tactics of the Internet Research Agency as discovered by several European newspapers including the London Times.

The crux of the issue for Mr. Gingras is that the Copyright Directive requires Google to pay a neighbouring rights royalty to newspapers whose work they use.  You may have heard the Google Alinsky-style semantical talking point of the “link tax”.

Google is now putting Mr. Gingras forward to be the Lyor-style face of its campaign against journalists and news organizations in France by throwing a new loophole in the face of the French government while at the same time stepping up its charm offensive by offering what certainly look like bribes to news organizations in Europe that play ball.

The loophole is Google’s use of its brutal market power to force newspapers to give them for free that which would otherwise attract essentially a statutory royalty.  Mr. Gingras is the face of this, a role for which we hope he’s being at least as well compensated as Lyor Cohen for doing what is effectively the same job—being the face of the charlatan.  The good news is that Google tipped their hand early in the transposition process so even France can go back and fix this competition law violation.

Thanks to the Google Transparency Project (full report here) we know that Mr. Gingras also brings a pot of gold to his version of the rainbow, either directly or indirectly, through spending on the ideation and flaring from the shill incubator:

The Google Transparency Project undertook the most comprehensive effort yet to collect all of Google’s payments to media organizations around the world in one place. The analysis included 16 different Google programs and related organizations and spanned more than a decade.

It revealed that Google and related entities have committed between $567 million and $569 million to support at least 1,157 media projects around the globe.  The analysis also identified another 170 projects supported by Google for which no funding information was publicly available, suggesting that the total amount the company has spent on media grants is likely far higher.

Google often boasts about its support for journalism, disclosing plans to spend over half a billion dollars on media initiatives since 2013. But Google isn’t always transparent about its spending, making it difficult to assess what the company is giving—and what it may be getting in return.

We haven’t seen Mr. Cohen waiving around this kind of cash aside from a few thousand euro we know about that was paid to some YouTube “creators” to produce anti-copyright directive materials.

Lyor really needs to do something about that disparity.  We’re way beyond YouTube “creator” studios now—user-generated never got hundreds of millions.  I wonder what Mr. Gingras makes by comparison to Mr. Cohen?

@kantrowitz: As Google Backlashes Have Risen And Fallen, So Have Its Grants To News Organizations via @artistrights

October 11, 2019 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez: Google attacks journalists with one hand, doles out the charm offensive cash with the other.]

Over more than a decade, Google and foundations run by its leaders have given hundreds of millions of dollars to journalists and news organizations around the world, sponsoring drones in Nigeria and Kenya, and local news in the US. But according to a new report, these grants tend to be made in places where the company faces pressure from politicians, the public, and the press, raising questions about whether the tech giant is committed to social good or buying itself goodwill.

The report, written by researchers at the Campaign for Accountability’s Google Transparency Project, shows a spike in funding in Europe when Google was under pressure in the mid- to late-2010s, and a subsequent uptick in the US amid a backlash that’s led to a Department of Justice investigation and calls for its breakup.

Read the post on Buzzfeed

The Coming Crisis: #SayNoToZoe on CASE Act Threats

September 17, 2019 Comments off

The new copyright small claims court legislation (The CASE Act) passed the House Judiciary Committee, but not without thuggery from Rep. Zoe Lofgren and the Internet Association. Chris Castle narrates the issues and proposes a solution for Big Tech’s “Senate strategy” that inevitably includes Senator Ron Wyden, the grifter from Oregon and proud father of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.  Lofgren’s threat comes about 8:27:00 on the YouTube video here.

Internet Association Statement on CASE Act

Michael Beckerman

Ron Wyden’s Teachable Moment: Should one Senator be allowed to stop 415 Members of Congress on the Pre-72 Fix

Did a Wyden Campaign Donor Fund Hedge Fund Operated Out of Senator’s Basement?

Are Data Centers The New Cornhusker Kickback and the Facebook Fakeout?

The Mother’s Milk of Algorithms: Google Expands Its Data Center Lobbying Footprint in Minnesota–Home to Senator Amy Klobuchar

ACLU takes a gratuitous swipe at the Copyright Office using a Google “study” to allege bias.  ACLU Statement on CASE Act

See: ACLU Gets $700,000 from Google Buzz Award musictechpolicy.com/2011/10/31/the-…r-the-company”/

ACLU Helps EFF With DMCA Delaying Tactics musictechpolicy.com/2010/07/07/aclu…laying-tactics/

ACLU Cribs from Google Lobbyists on Pro-Piracy Letter to Congress musictechpolicy.com/2016/05/04/why-…ns-from-google/

aclu cy pres

@musictechpolicy Podcast: Eight Mile Style Sues Spotify Under Music Modernization Act

August 30, 2019 Comments off

Chris Castle discussion of Eight Mile Style lawsuit against Spotify under Music Modernization Act (driving with dogs series)

Eight Mile Style v. Spotify Complaint

Meet the New Boss:  Tech Giants Rely on Loopholes to Avoid Paying Statutory Royalties with Mass Filings of NOIs at the Copyright Office

How to Contact the Court in PledgeMusic Case–The Trichordist

August 3, 2019 Comments off

PledgeMusic had posted this information on their website when we checked today:

As a result of the making of the order, the Official Receiver becomes liquidator of the company. Any enquiries should be forwarded to LondonB.OR@insolvency.gov.uk, quoting reference LQD5671373.

We gather that what that means is that if you are (1) an artist who is owed money by PledgeMusic, (2) a fan who gave money to an artist who you think did not receive your money from PledgeMusic, or (3) a vendor who didn’t get paid because PledgeMusic didn’t pay your artist, then you should write to that email address which we assume is for the “Official Receiver” who is now in charge of running the case.  (OK, that does sound like a character out of Harry Potter, but that’s how it is.)

We also assume because Pledge didn’t say that there is a deadline for submitting your claim there probably is one.  That’s probably why PledgeMusic didn’t say what the deadline was, a fact they almost certainly know very well.  Because if you fail to get your claim in on time, there’s more for them in the pot.  Ponzi to the very end.

You should take legal advice about what you should say and how to handle it, but if you can’t afford a lawyer you could say in your email that you think you are owed money, how much and why, and ask them what you should do about it.  It probably wouldn’t hurt to tell them what you have done to try to collect your money from Pledge and the approximate or exact dates you tried to get their attention.

And be sure to tell the Official Receiver if you think Pledge breached its obligations to you or otherwise did you wrong, threatened you, or any other bad stuff.

The Official Receiver probably frequently deals with people who are owed money and have no lawyer so don’t be shy about it.  The Insolvency Service (who actually appoints the Official Receiver) also responded to Chris Castle on Twitter:

Insolvency Service 1

We will keep you posted with more information as we find out.

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What’s the Current Status of PledgeMusic Case?

July 22, 2019 Comments off

 

What are the chances that PledgeMusic will just disappear into the night, never file bankruptcy and never pay back the artists, fans and vendors?  The less you talk about Pledge’s misdeeds, the more likely they simply are never pursued by anyone.

 

 

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