Archive

Author Archive

@MykiAngeline: @The_WIMN: Front And Center: @SoundExchange Senior Director Of Industry And Artist Relations, @LindaBlossBaum — Artist Rights Watch

[Editor Charlie sez: A must read interview with a true artist rights advocate, Linda Bloss-Baum.]

Music has come a long way since the age of vinyl records and cassette tapes. It wasn’t that long ago when the only way to listen to music was either attending a live performance, tune in to your favorite radio station, or purchase hard copies from your local music store. Now with the ability to stream music from the internet, listening to our favorite artist is readily at our finger tips. Anyone with a laptop or smart phone can access almost any artist and song.

It also became increasingly harder for music artists to get paid for their creations.

This is where companies like SoundExchange come into play, working at the center of digital music to develop business solutions that benefit the entire music industry. As the Senior Director of Industry and Artist Relations, Linda Bloss-Buam ensure that artists and rights owners are aware of all the services that SoundExchange has to offer.

Below, Linda shares with us how she applies her experience and training in music policies and practices, and what she is doing to increase awareness of women in the music industry.

Read the interview on the Women’s International Music Network

@RobertBLevine_: Federal ‘Transparency’ Bill Endangers Songwriters’ Leverage for Getting Paid

On the surface, at least, the “Transparency in Music Licensing Ownership Act,” introduced in the House of Representatives on July 20 by Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI), seems like a copyright bill that could help untangle the online music business….but the devil is in the details.

via @RobertBLevine_: Federal ‘Transparency’ Bill Endangers Songwriters’ Leverage for Getting Paid — Artist Rights Watch

@eriqgardner: Judge Rules KickassTorrents Founder Properly Charged With Criminal Copyright Conspiracy — Artist Rights Watch

[Editor Charlie sez–in a great day for artist rights, a federal judge rules that the KAT founder is properly charged under applicable US law.] For years, there’s been ample debate and scholarship on whether or not secondary copyright infringement constitutes a crime. On Friday, a federal judge in Illinois probably made the day of big […]

via @eriqgardner: Judge Rules KickassTorrents Founder Properly Charged With Criminal Copyright Conspiracy — Artist Rights Watch

@royaltyclaim CEO: Services are Spending $50,000 a week to file “address unknown” NOIs — Artist Rights Watch

[Editor Charlie sez:  $50,000 a week is $2,600,000 a year and that’s a whole bunch of streams.  Imagine if they just paid the damn royalties….]

Press Release Teaser: “DSPs are collectively spending an average of over $50,000 PER WEEK to file mass ‘address unknown’ NOIs under the Section 115 compulsory license provision of the US Copyright Act.” – Dae Bogan, Chief Researcher at Royalty Claim / CEO at TuneRegistry More facts to come out next week when he presents Royalty Claim’s report on the […]

via @royaltyclaim CEO: Services are Spending $50,000 a week to file “address unknown” NOIs — Artist Rights Watch

Don’t Believe the Astroturf: Yet More Regulations Won’t Help Songwriters or Small Business — Music Tech Solutions

By Chris Castle

“[Government] interference is but the first link of a long chain of repetitions, every subsequent interference being naturally produced by the effects of the preceding.” James Madison, The Federalist Papers No. 44

There is a bill in Congress backed by the mega lobbying juggernaut called the MIC Coalition that would force songwriters and artists to “register” with the government in order to protect their rights from the biggest corporations in the world. Failing to do so would take away the stick of statutory damages and an award of attorneys fees to songwriters or artists who are victorious in copyright infringement litigation. Statutory damages and attorneys’ fees are the only real protection that the government gives these creators–the smallest of small businesses.

via Don’t Believe the Astroturf: Yet More Regulations Won’t Help Songwriters or Small Business — Music Tech Solutions

@eriqgardner: Google Has a Big Canadian Problem — and It’s Getting Desperate — Artist Rights Watch

What is significant is that the case dealt with intellectual property and the possibility that Google might have to do more than pay lip service to piracy….If one didn’t know any better, it would be reasonable to assume that Google has lost its mind.

via @eriqgardner: Google Has a Big Canadian Problem — and It’s Getting Desperate — Artist Rights Watch

Guest Post by @theblakemorgan: Music’s Mentors and Heroes Get the Day They Deserve

July 20, 2017 Comments off

IRM blake jerry

This is great day, and a huge victory for music makers. In a bipartisan move, Rep. Nadler (D-NY) and Rep. Issa (R-CA) have just introduced the “Classics Act,” H.R. 3301, which finally guarantees that music recorded before 1972 would receive payments from digital radio services. (Currently only sound recordings made after 1972 receive payments from digital radio services under some interpretations of federal law.)

This issue has been at the very center of the #IRespectMusic campaign, and I’m thrilled to see this bill come to fruition. It’s happened in great part, because of you. Each and every person connected to this campaign has had a hand in this victory, because the grass-roots pressure that continues to be put on our leaders is what wins the day, every time. So if you’ve signed the I Respect Music Petition, if you’ve taken a selfie with the hashtag, if you’ve written your representative, hosted an #IRespectMusic event in your town, shared posts, tweeted, any and all in between…you’ve helped win this great day.

This is such a powerful moment for two important reasons:

(1) All music makers should be paid for their work––but especially recorded music’s founding generation of music makers. These are our legacy artists of Jazz, Blues, R&B, and so many other genres. They’re our mentors, our heroes––artists who are now in their seventies or eighties––who’ve been incomprehensibly denied their right to be paid for their iconic contributions to our society. As many of you know, the great Lesley Gore was not only one of those iconic artists, she was my godmother, and it infuriated me to no end that she was denied payment for her priceless work. This crusade is not simply ideological or professional for me, it’s personal.

(2) This moment is also significant because for the first time, a major Congressional bill that benefits music makers is being endorsed by an entity from “the other side.” In this case, internet-radio giant Pandora. Many if not most of you know my own history with Pandora (if not, start here).

It would be hard to find anyone, anywhere, who’s been more consistently critical of them than I’ve been. However, by standing up for this bill and standing with music makers, Pandora is doing the right thing and, I congratulate them for that. As a smart person once said, “You don’t make peace with your friends, you make peace with your enemies.” So, if this is a sign that Pandora has seen the light and will move forward in partnership with the people who make their only product––music––then I’m grateful, and I welcome them to a new future. A future where each of us understands that music isn’t created in a vacuum. It’s created by music makers. And each of us music makers has the right to expect from our profession what others expect from their professions. That through hard work and determination, perspiration and inspiration, we’ll have the same fair shot to realize our dreams, answer our callings, support our families.

Ours is a profession built on commitment. And respect.

Our music mentors and heroes have known that for a long time. They’ve deserved this day for a long time.

I’m going to honor them by fighting for this bill with everything I have.

I respect my mentors. I respect my heroes.

I respect music.

%d bloggers like this: