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@MusicFirst: Congress, end a longstanding injustice for legacy music creators #irespectmusic — Artist Rights Watch

May 18, 2018 Comments off

Otis Redding sat on the dock of the bay in 1967. Roy Orbison sang for the lonely in 1960. Miles Davis was kind of blue in 1959. These artists’ iconic recordings live on today and are frequently played across streaming services, satellite radio, and FM radio. Tell Congress to make Big Tech pay its fair share.

via @MusicFirst: Congress, end a longstanding injustice for legacy music creators #irespectmusic — Artist Rights Watch

Call to Action: Please Help Support Our Musical Legacy and Tell the Congress #irespectmusic on the CLASSICS Act

February 15, 2018 Comments off

joanaIRM

I don’t often ask MTP readers to agree with me, much less sign a petition.  But the exception proves the rule and I’m asking that you please sign the petition to support legislation in the U.S. Congress that would close the loophole that some digital music services have been leveraging for quite some time on so-called “pre-72” recordings.

If it sounds implausible that the date a record was released should make a difference in copyright protection or entitlement of the artists to the same royalties as everyone releasing records after that date–that’s because it is.  It’s actually worse–it’s the kind of thing that someone would do if they truly viewed music as a commodity.

But that’s exactly what Pandora and Sirius started doing a few years ago when a truly meanspirited bunch of lawyers and bean counters decided they could save a few bucks by stiffing old guys and dead cats and their heirs.  Between Pandora and Sirius, this bunch of rocket scientists have paid out $300 million in settlement to the major labels and will pay even more in that Turtles class action to the indie community.

And that’s right–these geniuses could have come out better if they had just paid the damn royalties in the first place.

So you know what this is about–it’s a piece of the #irespectmusic campaign for artist pay for radio play.  Except this time it’s about reclaiming rights we already fought over back in 1995.  It’s about claiming a little piece of righteousness for those who can’t do it themselves.

What these jerks at Pandora and Sirius (and the Digital Media Association) were really about was bootstrapping an issue into a bargaining chip by withholding payment on pre-72 recordings like bullies do.  And here’s why:  Remember Blake Morgan told us that the U.S. is one of the only countries in the world that doesn’t recognize a performance right for sound recordings?  Well, before 1972 the U.S. didn’t recognize a federal copyright in sound recordings at all.

The Congress amended that astonishing oversight in 1972 to recognize a federal sound recording copyright and then in 1995 and 1998 adopted a limited performance right in sound recordings performed in a digital medium.  You know–back when it didn’t seem like this funny digital thing didn’t matter much.  Under certain circumstances, there is also a royalty paid for digital performances for webcasting, simulcasting, satellite radio and a few other radio services.  That’s basically your “SoundExchange money.”

Sounds good, right?  Do you think that there was one member of Congress in 1995 who voted for the limited performance right but secretly said king’s x–a royalty for everyone except James Brown, Duke Ellington, Aretha Franklin, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong, Jimi Hendrix, Willie Nelson, Buddy Holly and ZZ Top?  No, but that’s what the Digital Media Association, the NAB and their knuckleheads would have you believe.  Remember–not even Pandora believes this bunk anymore.  Amazing what new lawyers will do for the soul.

So the Congress has been forced to introduce legislation to fix the pre-72 loophole once and for all–and that’s what I’d really appreciate your support for.  The bill is called the CLASSICS Act and it’s supported in the House by Ranking Member Jerry Nadler (D-#irespectmusic) and Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) and in the Senate by Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE) and Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA).

We have a lot of people to thank for advancing the ball to this point, especially all the folks carrying the legislation, but especially Ranking Member Jerry Nadler who thankfully believes in this so much he’s always up for another fight for artist rights.  We also have to thank The Turtles and their team, SoundExchange CEO Mike Huppe and his team, and Chris Israel and his team at MusicFirst.

You told them how you feel about #irespectmusic and I would ask you to please do it once again because we can’t stop fighting until the fight is done.  But don’t do it for me, do it for Ella, Aretha, the Duke, the Count, Maceo, Jimi with an i and Hendrix with an x.  Do it for all of those who came before, both living and back home and those they left behind.

We never ask you to sign anything you don’t understand, so if you’re still unclear, please let me know.

The MusicFirst Coalition has a petition here.  I’d really appreciate your signing up.

The Bipartisan Classics Act Is Ready For Prime Time: Time to fix Pre 1972 Loophole — The Trichordist

February 15, 2018 Comments off

Issa (R-CA) and Nadler (D-NY) sponsored the Classics Act in the house. Artists that had the misfortune to record before 1972 do not get royalties for the public performance of their recordings on satellite and non-interactive streaming services. This so-called loophole is simply a creation of federal courts (Ninth & Second) and apparent collusion by […]

via The Bipartisan Classics Act Is Ready For Prime Time: Time to fix Pre 1972 Loophole — The Trichordist

Press Release on CLASSICS Act to Close Pre-72 Loophole

February 14, 2018 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez:  Let’s not forget–if it weren’t for The Turtles stepping up with Henry Gradstein’s team and suing Sirius and Pandora in a class action to close the nasty loophole leveraged by their legal teams, none of this would be happening.  Artist class actions work and sometimes are the only thing that work.

The consensus behind the CLASSICS Act and songwriter complaints demonstrate that the Music Modernization Act is simply not ready for prime time.  If we’re not going to stand behaind Chairman Nadler’s Fair Play Fair Pay, the CLASSICS Act deserves a chance to stand alone and not be tied to the punitive and controversial Music Modernization Act that would vastly restrict songwriter class actions.  You can support the CLASSICS Act and also acknowledge that MMA is rushed, is full of problems and not ready for prime time.]

PRESS RELEASE


Historic Coalition of 213
Musical Artists Calls on Congress to Pass CLASSICS Act,

Fix the “Pre-1972” Loophole for Legacy Artists
Music Organizations Press Congress to Consolidate
Widely Backed Music Licensing Reforms Into Single Bill
WASHINGTON, February 13, 2018 — An unprecedented coalition of 213 musical artists, supported by eight leading music organizations, called upon the U.S. Congress to pass the CLASSICS Act, bipartisan legislation pending in both the House and Senate to address one of copyright law’s most glaring loopholes.
In a two-page advertisement that will appear in Wednesday’s Politico, the artists state:
Digital radio makes billions of dollars a year from airplay of music made before Feb. 15, 1972. Yet, because of an ambiguity in state and federal copyright laws, artists and copyright owners who created that music receive nothing for the use of their work. The CLASSICS Act (H.R. 3301 / S. 2393) would correct this inequity and finally ensure that musicians and vocalists who made those timeless songs finally get their due. We urge Congress to pass the CLASSICS Act and other pro-artist reforms quickly.
The advertisement marks the start of a robust advocacy campaign by artists and music community leaders A2IM, American Federation of Musicians, Content Creators Coalition, musicFIRST Coalition, Recording Academy, Recording Industry Association of America, SAG-AFTRA and SoundExchange.
The ad can be viewed here.
The CLASSICS Act is an essential component of a package of music licensing reforms supported by the organizations that includes additional critical reforms such as the Music Modernization Act (H.R. 4706 / S. 2334), the AMP Act (H.R. 881) and the establishment of market-based rate standards. In the coming weeks, music community leaders anticipate the House Judiciary Committee will commence formal consideration of the music licensing reform legislation with the goal of consolidating the key reforms into a single bill.

Must Read: @zvirosen Critiques Florida Flo & Eddie Ruling: Another Season, Another Common-Law Copyright Opinion — Artist Rights Watch

October 30, 2017 Comments off

The Turtles state law case in Florida on pre-72 case against SiriusXM gets a road bump from a results-oriented decision from the Florida Supreme Court.

via Must Read: @zvirosen Critiques Florida Flo & Eddie Ruling: Another Season, Another Common-Law Copyright Opinion — Artist Rights Watch

The MTP Podcast: Chris Castle Interviews Turtles Class Action Lawyer Henry Gradstein on the Case Against SiriusXM

November 30, 2016 Comments off
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