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20 Questions for New Artists Part 3: Insurance/Legal Names/DOB and Nationality

May 8, 2019 Comments off

For the next few weeks, we’re going to post sections from the article “20 Questions for New Artists” by Chris Castle and Amy Mitchell some of which has been posted various places. This doesn’t constitute legal advice, or any intent to form the attorney-client relationship. Chris, Amy and others will also be publishing occasional excerpts from the “Artist Glossary of Industry Terms” as a companion guide.

Insurance

Many bands overlook the importance of insurance, often until it is too late. Even if you don’t overlook it, many artists don’t fully understand why their coverage may be lacking. It is a very good idea for the band to meet with an insurance agent experienced in music industry insurance (we often recommend Doodson for liability insurance and the venerable MusicPro policy for affordable musical instrument insurance)  and get a report from that agent about the coverage the band has (if any) compared to what the agent recommends. In the early days, the band may not have sufficient monies to both get insurance and set up limited liability entities. We always recommend insurance in this case. At a minimum, the band should have commercial insurance on your van and sufficient coverage to protect against loss or damage to the band’s musical instruments (often different policies). If feasible, the band should also seek general entertainer liability insurance, which is an umbrella policy that covers artists above and beyond the typical automobile insurance and other common coverages. (Tip: Watch out for exclusions for thrown objects.)  You should also confirm which insurance programs might be available to you from you PRO membership (such as ASCAP’s insurance programs.)

Legal Names of Members

Each member should provide the managing member  or accountant with the member’s full legal name. This will be necessary for contracts, registration of copyrights, etc. It is a good idea to have a list of each member’s cell phone and email so you can give that to anyone who needs to reach the band, particularly on the road or in case of emergencies. If there are any sidemembers (i.e., “hired hands”), list them as well. This type of information can also help the band’s accountant spot red flags like the employee versus independent contractor issues.

Date of Birth and Nationality

It is important to know early on if any members are not of the age of majority in your stat so that if someone is under age, you will be prepared for any issues in your state relating to age of consent (usually for contracts) and employment law (performing in clubs that serve alcohol, for example). If the band tours out of state, you will need to consider these issues. Often this involves having a parent or guardian available to sign off on any written agreements. Many states have court procedures (particularly California) that can allow minors to have special rights to do business or make contracts, such as “emancipated minor” laws or “judicial ratification” of contracts. Do not assume that these laws apply to minors in your band without talking to an experienced labor lawyer familiar with your state (and any other states or countries you may be touring in). It’s also handy to have each member’s date of birth available for any copyright registration applications you file if required by the U.S. Copyright Office.

 

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