Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Steve Winogradsky’

A Guide to the Department of Justice Ruling on “100% Licensing”

December 11, 2017 Comments off

[Editor Charlie sez:  This is a repost of the original from September 2016 in light of the recent appeal by the Department of Justice.]

By Steve Winogradsky and Chris Castle, all rights reserved.

The recent ruling by the U.S. Department of Justice in United States v. Broadcast Music, Inc. and United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers has left many songwriters, publishers, motion picture and television producers and, yes, even lawyers scratching their heads to understand the import of the ruling.  Not to mention Texas Governor Greg Abbott who has written to Attorney General Loretta Lynch asking her to reconsider the DOJ ruling.

The authors have summarized the ruling in the chart that follows.  The thing speaks for itself.

As you will see, the left hand column lists the various roles of a music creator (starting with “Songwriter”) or music user.  The rows describe some of the potential combinations of co-writers who will run afoul of the DOJ’s ruling.  The chart is followed by a list of descriptions of what rule will apply to your situation.

If you find yourself in the left hand column, scan across the rows to see if you fit in any of the co-writer positions.  Then look for which note applies to you in the list of notes below the chart.

For example, if you are an ASCAP songwriter who has co-written with a BMI songwriter (1st box in column and 6th row across), Note E applies to you.

This chart is based on the authors’ interpretations of the DOJ’s statement and is not dispositive or based on a court ruling as there has been none as of this writing.  Obviously, this is not meant as legal advice and you should not rely on it.  This is a complex area that has gotten even more complex, and you should consult with your own lawyers.

For further background, listen to the MTP podcast with Steve Winogradsky, David Lowery and Chris Castle and read Steve’s book Music Publishing–the Complete Guide.  And essential reading on the issue is that evergreen resource for legal research on takings and other government behavior in the digital age, The Trial, by Franz Kafka.

By popular demand, download a copy of this post with the chart here.

 

100% ASCAP or 100% BMI (single writer or all co-writers belong to the same PRO) 100% SESAC and/or GMR

(single writer or all co-writers belong to one of these PROs)

100% Foreign PRO/ASCAP Collects in US 100% Foreign PRO/BMI Collects in US Co-write

ASCAP & BMI

Co-write ASCAP or BMI with Other U.S. PRO Co-write foreign writers, where 1 is represented in the U.S. by either ASCAP or BMI and the 2nd is represented by a different PRO
Songwriter Note A, below Note B, below Note A, below Note A, below Note E, below Note E, below Note E, below
Publisher Note A, below Note B, below Note A, below Note A, below Note F, below Note F, below Note F, below
TV Producer Note C, below Note B, below. Note C, below Note C, below Note G, below Note G, below Note G, below
Film Producer Note C, below Note D, below Note C, below Note C, below Note G, below Note G, below Note G, below
Webcaster Note A, below Note B, below Note A, below Note A, below Note G, below Note G, below Note G, below
TV Broadcaster Note A, below Note B, below Note A, below Note A, below Note H, below Note H, below Note H, below
Radio broadcaster (terrestrial or satellite) Note A, below Note B, below Note A, below Note A, below Note I, below Note I, below Note I, below
Interactive Streaming (Subpart B&C) Note A, below Note B, below Note A, below Note A, below Note J, below Note J, below Note J, below

Notes

A. All songs may be licensed under either ASCAP or BMI’s blanket licenses

B. All songs may be licensed under both SESAC and GMR’s blanket licenses

C. Obtain synchronization licenses from each party for their respective shares, as is current custom and practice. All songs may be licensed under either ASCAP or BMI’s blanket licenses

D. Obtain synchronization licenses from each party for their respective shares, as is current custom and practice. All songs may be licensed under both SESAC and GMR’s blanket licenses

E. Songs may not be licensed under a blanket license from ASCAP or BMI unless the co-writers agree to have only one PRO administer a particular song, which may require restructuring their co-writer agreement and PROs setting up a structure for paying non-member writers. Depending on their songwriter/publisher agreements, writers could issue direct licenses to users upon request and collect performance royalties directly

F. Songs may not be licensed under a blanket license unless the co-publishers agree to have only one PRO administer a particular song, which may require restructuring their co-publishing agreement and PROs setting up a structure for paying non-member writers & publishers. Publishers could issue direct licenses to users upon request (which might include the writer’s share) and collect performance royalties directly

G. Obtain synchronization licenses from each party, as is current custom and practice. Songs may not be licensed under a blanket license unless the co-publishers agree to have only one PRO administer a particular song, which may require restructuring their co-publishing agreement. TV, film or webcaster producer could request directly performance licenses and pay parties directly. If no direct licenses are available and songs are not covered under the blanket license, producer may not include songs in their productions.

H. Songs may not be licensed under a blanket license unless the co-publishers agree to have only one PRO administer a particular song, which may require restructuring their co-publishing agreement. Broadcaster can either require TV & film producers to obtain direct licenses or broadcaster can obtain them directly from publishers (which would include the writer’s share of royalties. If no direct licenses are available and songs are not covered under the blanket license, producer may not include songs in their productions.

I. Songs may not be licensed under a blanket license unless the co-publishers agree to have only one PRO administer a particular song, which may require restructuring their co-publishing agreement. Broadcaster can obtain direct licenses from publishers (which would include the writer’s share of royalties). If no direct licenses are available and songs are not covered under the blanket license, broadcaster may not include these songs in their broadcasts.

J. Songs may not be licensed under a blanket license unless the co-publishers agree to have only one PRO administer a particular song, which may require restructuring their co-publishing agreement. Streaming service can obtain direct licenses from publishers (which would include the writer’s share of royalties). If no direct licenses are available and songs are not covered under the blanket license, broadcaster may not include these songs in their streaming service.

 

 

The MTP Podcast: The Consequences of DOJ’s New Rule on 100% Licensing with David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky and Chris Castle

August 10, 2016 1 comment

David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky and Chris Castle discuss the implications of the new rule by the U.S. Department of Justice re-interpreting the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees to require 100% licensing and prohibiting partial withdrawal.

David Lowery is the founder of Cracker and Camper van Beethoven, leading artist rights advocate and writer of The Trichordist blog, and teaches at the Terry School of Business at the University of Georgia at Athens.

Steve Winogradsky is a senior music lawyer and co-proprietor of the music services company Winogradsky/Sobel in Los Angeles.  Steve teaches at UCLA and Cal State Northridge and is the author of a leading legal handbook Music Publishing: The Complete Guide.

Chris Castle is founder of Christian L. Castle, Attorneys in Austin, Texas and edits the MusicTechPolicy blog.  He is formerly an adjunct professor at the University of Texas School of Law, and lectures at law schools, music schools and business schools in the U.S. and Canada.

“Where’d You Get the Music” performed by Guy Forsyth.

Subscribe to the MTP Podcasts on iTunes.

Topics Covered:

–The DOJ’s new rule in the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees.  Background link to DOJ statement and link to BMI’s “pre-motion” letter to BMI rate court judge outlining BMI’s objections to new DOJ rule.

–Will songwriters have to indemnify PROs for antitrust violations of failing to renegotiate licenses?

–Who bears the administrative costs?

–How DOJ’s new rule is actually anticompetitive and anticompetitive aspects of direct licensing.

–Is DOJ rule Google’s payback to Pharrell Williams refusing to license for YouTube?

–Devastating impact on music in television programs and motion pictures, “WKRP revisited”

–Google’s influence on the new rule through Renata B. Hesse, the new head of the Antitrust Division.  Background link: How Google Took Over the Justice Department Antitrust Division: Renata Hesse’s Timeline

–What is the plain English version of the new rule?

–How U.S. Copyright Office rejected DOJ’s position.  Background link to Copyright Office report rejecting DOJ’s position.

–DOJ requirement that songwriters renegotiate split agreements on every song registered with ASCAP and BMI

–Genre-based impact on hip hop and country music.

 

Next up:  Michelle Lewis and Kay Hanley of Songwriters of North America and David Lowery discuss DOJ ruling from songwriter’s perspective with Chris Castle.

Watch this Space: MTP Podcast on 100% Licensing with David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky, Chris Castle coming soon

August 6, 2016 Comments off

The MusicTechPolicy podcast is back!  Next week we will kick things off with a discussion of the Department of Justice [sic] ruling on 100% licensing and partial withdrawals.

Participants will be David Lowery, Steve Winogradsky of Winogradsky/Sobel and author of Music Publishing: The Complete Guide and me.

Watch this space for links to the podcast when it is completed, probably August 10/11.

In the meantime, you can subscribe to the MTP Podcast on iTunes or on Stitcher.  More recent podcasts can also be found on SoundCloud.

%d bloggers like this: