Home > Cloudflare, Uncategorized > Rut Roh: @LibraryCongress Hoster Cloudflare Discloses “Incorrect” Submissions to Treasury Dept. Office of Foreign Assets Control For Blacklist Payments by Narcotraficante

Rut Roh: @LibraryCongress Hoster Cloudflare Discloses “Incorrect” Submissions to Treasury Dept. Office of Foreign Assets Control For Blacklist Payments by Narcotraficante

September 12, 2019

Cloudflare’s drip drip drip:  If we’re caught dealing with criminals it could have a material adverse effect on our business.

As reported by Mengqi Sun in the Wall Street Journal, 8Chan and Library of Congress hosting provider Cloudflare amends IPO documents on September 10 to disclose to the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control violations of U.S. economic and trade sanctions regulations by trading with terrorists and narcotraficante that have been blacklisted by the U.S. but paid money to Cloudflare. AKA blood money.

Isn’t it time for the U.S. Government to at least review any contracts with Cloudflare?  Sounds like a job for the Scooby Doo Gang.

Fortunately, #irespectmusic fan Rep. Ted Deutch was already on top of it and had questioned the wisdom of continuing that contract at a recent House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing.

As we all collectively gasp, ask yourself this question:  If Cloudflare has this problem–why doesn’t Google have a much bigger version of the same problem?

Here’s the except from the amended Cloudflare IPO document (Form S-1 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission):

We are subject to governmental trade sanctions laws, and export and import controls, that could impair our ability to compete in international markets and subject us to liability if we are not in full compliance with applicable laws.

Our business activities are subject to various economic and trade sanctions regulations administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) and U.S. export control and similar foreign laws and regulations, including the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Export Administration Regulations (EAR). We incorporate encryption technology into certain of our products, and the encryption products and the underlying technology may be exported outside the United States only with the required export authorizations, including by license, a license exception or other appropriate government authorizations, including the filing of classification requests or self-classification reports. Further, the U.S. economic sanctions laws and export control laws include restrictions or prohibitions on the sale or supply of most products and services to U.S. embargoed or sanctioned countries, governments, persons, and entities. Even though we take precautions and have implemented policies and practices to assist in compliance, there is a risk that we may not be in full compliance with these laws.

In 2019, we learned that we may have failed to comply with certain U.S. export-related filing and reporting requirements and may have submitted incorrect information to the U.S. government in connection with certain hardware exports. Upon learning of these potential violations and associated export control requirements, we promptly initiated a voluntary internal review and are taking remedial measures to prevent similar export control anomalies from occurring in the future. In May 2019, we submitted a voluntary self-disclosure to the Bureau of Industry and Security regarding potential violations of EAR and a voluntary self-disclosure to the Census Bureau regarding potential violations of the Foreign Trade Regulations. These voluntary self-disclosures are under review by the respective agencies.

In May 2019, we submitted a voluntary self-disclosure to OFAC related to our non-compliance with certain economic and trade sanctions programs. Specifically, we identified that our products were used by, or for the benefit of, certain individuals and entities included in OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (the SDN List), including entities identified in OFAC’s counter-terrorism and counter-narcotics trafficking sanctions programs, or affiliated with governments currently subject to comprehensive U.S. sanctions. A small number of these parties made payments to us in connection with their use of our platform. Although we have implemented, and are working to implement additional controls and screening tools designed to prevent similar activity from occurring in the future, there is no guarantee that we will not inadvertently provide our products to additional individuals, entities, or governments prohibited by U.S. sanctions in the future. The voluntary self-disclosure is under review by OFAC.

Additionally, we currently provide products to certain OFAC-sanctioned regions based upon general licenses issued by OFAC to engage in such activity. We continue to review the OFAC sanctions and our practices to verify compliance.

These efforts related to export controls and OFAC sanctions could result in negative consequences for us, including costs related to government investigations, financial penalties and harm to our reputation. The impact on us related to these matters could be substantial.

In addition, various countries regulate the import of certain technologies and have enacted or could enact laws that could limit our ability to provide our products and operate our network or could limit our customers’ ability to access or use our platform and products in those countries.

If we are found to have violated the U.S. or foreign laws and regulations, we and certain of our employees could be subject to civil or criminal penalties, including the possible loss of export privileges and fines. We may be materially and adversely affected through penalties, reputational harm, loss of access to certain markets, or otherwise. Obtaining the necessary authorizations, including any required license, for a particular transaction may be time-consuming, is not guaranteed, and may result in the delay or loss of sales opportunities. In addition, changes in our platform, products, or screening process, or changes in export, sanctions, and import laws, could delay the introduction and sale of subscriptions to our products in international markets, prevent customers in certain countries from accessing our platform and products or, in some cases, prevent the provision of our platform and products to certain countries, governments, persons, or entities altogether. Any decrease in our ability to sell our products could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

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